Categories
Cloud DevOps History Software Engineering

Agile Manifesto – The Manifesto for Agile Software Development

See also: Agile software development and DevOps

The Manifesto for Agile Software Development

Agile software development values

“Based on their combined experience of developing software and helping others do that, the seventeen signatories to the manifesto proclaimed that they value:[5]” (WP)

  • Individuals and interactions over processes and tools
  • Working software over comprehensive documentation
  • Customer collaboration over contract negotiation
  • Responding to change over following a plan

That is to say, the items on the left are valued more than the items on the right.

As Scott Ambler elucidated:[21]

  • Tools and processes are important, but it is more important to have competent people working together effectively.
  • Good documentation is useful in helping people to understand how the software is built and how to use it, but the main point of development is to create software, not documentation.
  • A contract is important but is no substitute for working closely with customers to discover what they need.
  • A project plan is important, but it must not be too rigid to accommodate changes in technology or the environment, stakeholders’ priorities, and people’s understanding of the problem and its solution.

Some of the authors formed the Agile Alliance, a non-profit organization that promotes software development according to the manifesto’s values and principles. Introducing the manifesto on behalf of the Agile Alliance, Jim Highsmith said,

The Agile movement is not anti-methodology, in fact many of us want to restore credibility to the word methodology. We want to restore a balance. We embrace modeling, but not in order to file some diagram in a dusty corporate repository. We embrace documentation, but not hundreds of pages of never-maintained and rarely-used tomes. We plan, but recognize the limits of planning in a turbulent environment. Those who would brand proponents of XP or SCRUM or any of the other Agile Methodologies as “hackers” are ignorant of both the methodologies and the original definition of the term hacker.— Jim Highsmith, History: The Agile Manifesto[22]

Agile software development principles

The Manifesto for Agile Software Development is based on twelve principles:[23]” (WP)

  1. Customer satisfaction by early and continuous delivery of valuable software.
  2. Welcome changing requirements, even in late development.
  3. Deliver working software frequently (weeks rather than months)
  4. Close, daily cooperation between business people and developers
  5. Projects are built around motivated individuals, who should be trusted
  6. Face-to-face conversation is the best form of communication (co-location)
  7. Working software is the primary measure of progress
  8. Sustainable development, able to maintain a constant pace
  9. Continuous attention to technical excellence and good design
  10. Simplicity—the art of maximizing the amount of work not done—is essential
  11. Best architectures, requirements, and designs emerge from self-organizing teams
  12. Regularly, the team reflects on how to become more effective, and adjusts accordingly

Categories

Sources:

Fair Use Sources:

Categories
Software Engineering

ISP – Interface segregation principle of SOLID object-oriented design

In the field of software engineering, the interface-segregation principle (ISP) states that no client should be forced to depend on methods it does not use.[1] ISP splits interfaces that are very large into smaller and more specific ones so that clients will only have to know about the methods that are of interest to them. Such shrunken interfaces are also called role interfaces.[2] ISP is intended to keep a system decoupled and thus easier to refactor, change, and redeploy. ISP is one of the five SOLID principles of object-oriented design, similar to the High Cohesion Principle of GRASP.[3]” (WP)

SOLID
Principles of Object-Oriented Design
SSingle responsibility principle – SRP
OOpen–closed
LLiskov substitution principle – LSP
IInterface segregation principle – ISP
DDependency inversion – DI

” (WP)

Sources:

Fair Use Sources:

Categories
Software Engineering

LSP- Liskov substitution principle of SOLID object-oriented design

” (WP)

Substitutability is a principle in object-oriented programming stating that, in a computer program, if S is a subtype of T, then objects of type T may be replaced with objects of type S (i.e., an object of type T may be substituted with any object of a subtype S) without altering any of the desirable properties of the program (correctness, task performed, etc.). More formally, the Liskov substitution principle (LSP) is a particular definition of a subtyping relation, called (strongbehavioral subtyping, that was initially introduced by Barbara Liskov in a 1987 conference keynote address titled Data abstraction and hierarchy. It is a semantic rather than merely syntactic relation, because it intends to guarantee semantic interoperability of types in a hierarchy, object types in particular. Barbara Liskov and Jeannette Wing described the principle succinctly in a 1994 paper as follows:[1]

Subtype Requirement: Let {\displaystyle \phi (x)}\phi (x) be a property provable about objects {\displaystyle x}x of type T. Then {\displaystyle \phi (y)}{\displaystyle \phi (y)} should be true for objects {\displaystyle y}y of type S where S is a subtype of T.

In the same paper, Liskov and Wing detailed their notion of behavioral subtyping in an extension of Hoare logic, which bears a certain resemblance to Bertrand Meyer‘s design by contract in that it considers the interaction of subtyping with preconditionspostconditions and invariants.

SOLID
Principles of Object-Oriented Design
SSingle responsibility principle – SRP
OOpen–closed
LLiskov substitution principle – LSP
IInterface segregation principle – ISP
DDependency inversion – DI

” (WP)

Sources:

Fair Use Sources:

Categories
Software Engineering

Open–closed principle of SOLID object-oriented design

” (WP)

In object-oriented programming, the open–closed principle states “software entities (classes, modules, functions, etc.) should be open for extension, but closed for modification“;[1] that is, such an entity can allow its behaviour to be extended without modifying its source code.

The name open–closed principle has been used in two ways. Both ways use generalizations (for instance, inheritance or delegate functions) to resolve the apparent dilemma, but the goals, techniques, and results are different.

Open–closed principle is one of the five SOLID principles of object-oriented design.

SOLID
Principles of Object-Oriented Design
SSingle responsibility principle – SRP
OOpen–closed
LLiskov substitution principle – LSP
IInterface segregation principle – ISP
DDependency inversion – DI

” (WP)

Sources:

Fair Use Sources:

Categories
Software Engineering

SRP – Single-responsibility principle of SOLID object-oriented design

“The single-responsibility principle (SRP) is a computer-programming principle that states that every moduleclass or function in a computer program should have responsibility over a single part of that program’s functionality, and it should encapsulate that part. All of that module, class or function’s services should be narrowly aligned with that responsibility.[1]” (WP)

Robert C. Martin, the originator of the term, expresses the principle as, “A class should have only one reason to change,”[1] although, because of confusion around the word “reason” he more recently stated “This principle is about people.”[2]” (WP)

SOLID
Principles of Object-Oriented Design
SSingle responsibility principle – SRP
OOpen–closed
LLiskov substitution principle – LSP
IInterface segregation principle – ISP
DDependency inversion – DI

” (WP)

Sources:

Fair Use Sources:

Categories
Software Engineering

SOLID (object-oriented design)

This article is about the SOLID principles of object-oriented programming. For the fundamental state of matter, see Solid. For other uses, see Solid (disambiguation).

SOLID
Principles of Object-Oriented Design
SSingle responsibility principle – SRP
OOpen–closed
LLiskov substitution principle – LSP
IInterface segregation principle – ISP
DDependency inversion – DI

“In object-oriented computer programmingSOLID is a mnemonic acronym for five design principles intended to make software designs more understandable, flexible, and maintainable. The principles are a subset of many principles promoted by American software engineer and instructor Robert C. Martin,[1][2][3] first introduced in his 2000 paper Design Principles and Design Patterns.[2][4]” (WP)

The SOLID concepts are:

The SOLID acronym was introduced later, around 2004, by Michael Feathers.[11]

“Although the SOLID principles apply to any object-oriented design, they can also form a core philosophy for methodologies such as agile development or adaptive software development.[3]” (WP)

See also

References

  1. ^ Robert C. Martin“Principles Of OOD”butunclebob.com. Retrieved 2014-07-17.. (Note the reference to “the first five principles”, although the acronym is not used in this article.) Dates back to at least 2003.
  2. a b Robert C. Martin. “Getting a SOLID start”objectmentor.com. Retrieved 2013-08-19.
  3. a b Sandi Metz (May 2009). “SOLID Object-Oriented Design”. Retrieved 2019-08-13. Talk given at the 2009 Gotham Ruby Conference.
  4. a b c Martin, Robert C. (2000). “Design Principles and Design Patterns” (PDF). Archived from the original (PDF) on 2015-09-06.
  5. ^ “Single Responsibility Principle” (PDF). objectmentor.com. Archived from the original (PDF) on 2 February 2015.
  6. ^ Martin, Robert C. (2003). Agile Software Development, Principles, Patterns, and Practices. Prentice Hall. p. 95. ISBN 978-0135974445.
  7. ^ “Open/Closed Principle” (PDF). objectmentor.com. Archived from the original (PDF) on 5 September 2015.
  8. ^ “Liskov Substitution Principle” (PDF). objectmentor.com. Archived from the original (PDF) on 5 September 2015.
  9. ^ “Interface Segregation Principle” (PDF). objectmentor.com. 1996. Archived from the original (PDF) on 5 September 2015.
  10. ^ “Dependency Inversion Principle” (PDF). objectmentor.com. Archived from the original (PDF) on 5 September 2015.
  11. ^ Martin, Robert (2018). Clean Architecture: A Craftsman’s Guide to Software Structure and Design. p. 58. ISBN 9780134494166.

Categories

Sources:

Fair Use Sources:

Categories
Software Engineering

DI – Dependency inversion principle of SOLID object-oriented design

“In object-oriented design, the dependency inversion principle is a specific form of loosely coupling software modules. When following this principle, the conventional dependency relationships established from high-level, policy-setting modules to low-level, dependency modules are reversed, thus rendering high-level modules independent of the low-level module implementation details. The principle states:[1]” (WP)

  1. High-level modules should not depend on low-level modules. Both should depend on abstractions (e.g., interfaces).
  2. Abstractions should not depend on details. Details (concrete implementations) should depend on abstractions.
SOLID
Principles of Object-Oriented Design
SSingle responsibility principle – SRP
OOpen–closed
LLiskov substitution principle – LSP
IInterface segregation principle – ISP
DDependency inversion – DI

“By dictating that both high-level and low-level objects must depend on the same abstraction, this design principle inverts the way some people may think about object-oriented programming.[2]” (WP)

“The idea behind points A and B of this principle is that when designing the interaction between a high-level module and a low-level one, the interaction should be thought of as an abstract interaction between them. This not only has implications on the design of the high-level module, but also on the low-level one: the low-level one should be designed with the interaction in mind and it may be necessary to change its usage interface.” (WP)

“In many cases, thinking about the interaction in itself as an abstract concept allows the coupling of the components to be reduced without introducing additional coding patterns, allowing only a lighter and less implementation-dependent interaction schema.” (WP)

“When the discovered abstract interaction schema(s) between two modules is/are generic and generalization makes sense, this design principle also leads to the following dependency inversion coding pattern.” (WP)

Traditional layers pattern

In conventional application architecture, lower-level components (e.g., Utility Layer) are designed to be consumed by higher-level components (e.g., Policy Layer) which enable increasingly complex systems to be built. In this composition, higher-level components depend directly upon lower-level components to achieve some task. This dependency upon lower-level components limits the reuse opportunities of the higher-level components.[1]

Traditional Layers Pattern.png

The goal of the dependency inversion pattern is to avoid this highly coupled distribution with the mediation of an abstract layer, and to increase the re-usability of higher/policy layers.

Dependency inversion pattern

With the addition of an abstract layer, both high- and lower-level layers reduce the traditional dependencies from top to bottom. Nevertheless, the “inversion” concept does not mean that lower-level layers depend on higher-level layers. Both layers should depend on abstractions that draw the behavior needed by higher-level layers.

DIPLayersPattern.png

In a direct application of dependency inversion, the abstracts are owned by the upper/policy layers. This architecture groups the higher/policy components and the abstractions that define lower services together in the same package. The lower-level layers are created by inheritance/implementation of these abstract classes or interfaces.[1]

The inversion of the dependencies and ownership encourages the re-usability of the higher/policy layers. Upper layers could use other implementations of the lower services. When the lower-level layer components are closed or when the application requires the reuse of existing services, it is common that an Adapter mediates between the services and the abstractions.

Dependency inversion pattern generalization

In many projects the dependency inversion principle and pattern are considered as a single concept that should be generalized, i.e., applied to all interfaces between software modules. There are at least two reasons for that:

  1. It is simpler to see a good thinking principle as a coding pattern. Once an abstract class or an interface has been coded, the programmer may say: “I have done the job of abstraction”.
  2. Because many unit testing tools rely on inheritance to accomplish mocking, the usage of generic interfaces between classes (not only between modules when it makes sense to use generality) became the rule.

If the mocking tool used relies only on inheritance, it may become necessary to widely apply the dependency inversion pattern. This has major drawbacks:

  1. Merely implementing an interface over a class isn’t sufficient to reduce coupling; only thinking about the potential abstraction of interactions can lead to a less coupled design.
  2. Implementing generic interfaces everywhere in a project makes it harder to understand and maintain. At each step the reader will ask themself what are the other implementations of this interface and the response is generally: only mocks.
  3. The interface generalization requires more plumbing code, in particular factories that generally rely on a dependency-injection framework.
  4. Interface generalization also restricts the usage of the programming language.

Generalization restrictions

The presence of interfaces to accomplish the Dependency Inversion Pattern (DIP) has other design implications in an object-oriented program:

  • All member variables in a class must be interfaces or abstracts.
  • All concrete class packages must connect only through interface or abstract class packages.
  • No class should derive from a concrete class.
  • No method should override an implemented method.[1]
  • All variable instantiation requires the implementation of a creational pattern such as the factory method or the factory pattern, or the use of a dependency-injection framework.

Interface mocking restrictions

Using inheritance-based mocking tools also introduces restrictions:

  • Static externally visible members should systematically rely on dependency injection making them far harder to implement.
  • All testable methods should become an interface implementation or an override of an abstract definition.

Future directions

Principles are ways of thinking. Patterns are common ways to solve problems. Coding patterns may be missing programming language features.

  • Programming languages will continue to evolve to allow them to enforce stronger and more precise usage contracts in at least two directions: enforcing usage conditions (pre-, post- and invariant conditions) and state-based interfaces. This will probably encourage and potentially simplify a stronger application of the dependency inversion pattern in many situations.
  • More and more mocking tools now use dependency-injection to solve the problem of replacing static and non virtual members. Programming languages will probably evolve to generate mocking-compatible bytecode. One direction will be to restrict the usage of non-virtual members. The other one will be to generate, at least in test situations, bytecode allowing non-inheritance based mocking.

Implementations

Two common implementations of DIP use similar logical architecture but with different implications.

A direct implementation packages the policy classes with service abstracts classes in one library. In this implementation high-level components and low-level components are distributed into separate packages/libraries, where the interfaces defining the behavior/services required by the high-level component are owned by, and exist within the high-level component’s library. The implementation of the high-level component’s interface by the low-level component requires that the low-level component package depend upon the high-level component for compilation, thus inverting the conventional dependency relationship.

Dependency inversion.png

Figures 1 and 2 illustrate code with the same functionality, however in Figure 2, an interface has been used to invert the dependency. The direction of dependency can be chosen to maximize policy code reuse, and eliminate cyclic dependencies.

In this version of DIP, the lower layer component’s dependency on the interfaces/abstracts in the higher-level layers makes re-utilization of the lower layer components difficult. This implementation instead ″inverts″ the traditional dependency from top-to-bottom to the opposite, from bottom-to-top.

A more flexible solution extracts the abstract components into an independent set of packages/libraries:

DIPLayersPattern v2.png

The separation of each layer into its own package encourages re-utilization of any layer, providing robustness and mobility.[1]

Examples

Genealogical module

A genealogical system may represent relationships between people as a graph of direct relationships between them (father-son, father-daughter, mother-son, mother-daughter, husband-wife, wife-husband, etc.). This is very efficient and extensible, as it is easy to add an ex-husband or a legal guardian.

But some higher-level modules may require a simpler way to browse the system: any person may have children, parents, siblings (including half-brothers and -sisters or not), grandparents, cousins, and so on.

Depending on the usage of the genealogical module, presenting common relationships as distinct direct properties (hiding the graph) will make the coupling between a higher-level module and the genealogical module much lighter and allow one to change the internal representation of the direct relationships completely without any effect on the modules using them. It also permits embedding exact definitions of siblings or uncles in the genealogical module, thus enforcing the single responsibility principle.

Finally, if the first extensible generalized graph approach seems the most extensible, the usage of the genealogical module may show that a more specialized and simpler relationship implementation is sufficient for the application(s) and helps create a more efficient system.

In this example, abstracting the interaction between the modules leads to a simplified interface of the lower-level module and may lead to a simpler implementation of it.

Remote file server client

Imagine you have to implement a client to a remote file server (FTP, cloud storage …). You may think of it as a set of abstract interfaces:

  1. Connection/Disconnection (a connection persistence layer may be needed)
  2. Folder/tags creation/rename/delete/list interface
  3. File creation/replacement/rename/delete/read interface
  4. File searching
  5. Concurrent replacement or delete resolution
  6. File history management …

If both local files and remote files offers the same abstract interfaces, any high-level module using local files and fully implementing the dependency inversion pattern will be able to access local and remote files indiscriminately.

Local disk will generally use folder, remote storage may use folder and/or tags. You have to decide how to unify them if possible.

On remote file we may have to use only create or replace: remote files update do not necessarily make sense because random update is too slow comparing local file random update and may be very complicated to implement). On remote file we may need partial read and write (at least inside the remote file module to allow download or upload to resume after a communication interruption), but random read isn’t adapted (except if a local cache is used).

File searching may be pluggable : file searching can rely on the OS or in particular for tag or full text search, be implemented with distinct systems (OS embedded, or available separately).

Concurrent replacement or delete resolution detection may impact the other abstract interfaces.

When designing the remote file server client for each conceptual interface you have to ask yourself the level of service your high level modules require (not necessary all of them) and not only how to implement the remote file server functionalities but maybe how to make the file services in your application compatible between already implemented file services (local files, existing cloud clients) and your new remote file server client.

Once you have designed the abstract interfaces required, your remote file server client should implement these interfaces. And because you probably restricted some local functionalities existing on local file (for example file update), you may have to write adapters for local or other existing used remote file access modules each offering the same abstract interfaces. You also have to write your own file access enumerator allowing to retrieve all file compatible systems available and configured on your computer.

Once you do that, your application will be able to save its documents locally or remotely transparently. Or simpler, the high level module using the new file access interfaces can be used indistinctly in local or remote file access scenarios making it reusable.

Remark: many OSes have started to implement these kind of functionalities and your work may be limited to adapt your new client to this already abstracted models.

In this example, thinking of the module as a set of abstract interfaces, and adapting other modules to this set of interfaces, allows you to provide a common interface for many file storage systems.

Model View Controller

Example of DIP

UI and ApplicationLayer packages contains mainly concrete classes. Controllers contains abstracts/interface types. UI has an instance of ICustomerHandler. All packages are physically separated. In the ApplicationLayer there is a concrete implementation that Page class will use. Instances of this interface are created dynamically by a Factory (possibly in the same Controllers package). The concrete types, Page and CustomerHandler, don’t depend on each other; both depend on ICustomerHandler.

The direct effect is that the UI doesn’t need to reference the ApplicationLayer or any concrete package that implements the ICustomerHandler. The concrete class will be loaded using reflection. At any moment the concrete implementation could be replaced by another concrete implementation without changing the UI class. Another interesting possibility is that the Page class implements an interface IPageViewer that could be passed as an argument to ICustomerHandler methods. Then the concrete implementation could communicate with UI without a concrete dependency. Again, both are linked by interfaces.

Related patterns

Applying the dependency inversion principle can also be seen as an example of the adapter pattern, i.e. the high-level class defines its own adapter interface which is the abstraction that the other high-level classes depend on. The adaptee implementation also depends on the adapter interface abstraction (of course, since it implements its interface) while it can be implemented by using code from within its own low-level module. The high-level has no dependency on the low-level module since it only uses the low-level indirectly through the adapter interface by invoking polymorphic methods to the interface which are implemented by the adaptee and its low-level module.

Various patterns such as Plugin, Service Locator, or Dependency injection are employed to facilitate the run-time provisioning of the chosen low-level component implementation to the high-level component.

History

The dependency inversion principle was postulated by Robert C. Martin and described in several publications including the paper Object Oriented Design Quality Metrics: an analysis of dependencies,[3] an article appearing in the C++ Report in May 1996 entitled The Dependency Inversion Principle,[4] and the books Agile Software Development, Principles, Patterns, and Practices,[1] and Agile Principles, Patterns, and Practices in C#.

See also

References

  1. a b c d e f Martin, Robert C. (2003). Agile Software Development, Principles, Patterns, and Practices. Prentice Hall. pp. 127–131. ISBN 978-0135974445.
  2. ^ Freeman, Eric; Freeman, Elisabeth; Kathy, Sierra; Bert, Bates (2004). Hendrickson, Mike; Loukides, Mike (eds.). Head First Design Patterns (paperback). 1. O’REILLY. ISBN 978-0-596-00712-6. Retrieved 2012-06-21.
  3. ^ Martin, Robert C. (October 1994). “Object Oriented Design Quality Metrics: An analysis of dependencies” (PDF). Retrieved 2016-10-15.
  4. ^ Martin, Robert C. (May 1996). “The Dependency Inversion Principle” (PDF). C++ Report. Archived from the original (PDF) on 2011-07-14.

External links

Categories

” (WP)

Sources:

Fair Use Sources:

Categories
Java Software Engineering

Java documentation

See also Java Programming Language, Java Glossary, Java Bibliography, Java Reference materials

Whether you are working on a new cutting edge app or simply ramping up on new technology, Java documentation has all the information you need to make your project a smashing success. Use the rich set of code samples, tutorials, developer guides, API documentation, and more to quickly develop your prototype and scale it up to a real world application.

Java Platform, Standard Edition (Java SE)

Java SE lets you develop and deploy Java applications on desktops and servers. Java SE and component technologies offer the rich user interface, performance, versatility, portability, and security that today’s applications require.Java SE Documentation

Java Embedded

Java ME Embedded is designed for resource-constrained devices like wireless modules for M2M, industrial control, smart-grid infrastructure, environmental sensors and tracking, and more.Java ME Embedded documentationOracle Java SE Embedded delivers a secure, optimized runtime environment ideal for network-based devices.Oracle Java SE Embedded and JDK for ARM documentationJava Card technology provides a secure environment for applications that run on smart cards and other devices with very limited memory and processing capabilities. Java Card documentation

Java Platform, Enterprise Edition (Java EE)

Java EE provides an API and runtime environment for developing and running large, multi-tiered, reliable, and secure enterprise applications that are portable and scalable and that integrate easily with legacy applications and data.

Java EE documentation

Sources:

Fair Use Sources:

Categories
Java Software Engineering

Java Glossary

See also Java Programming Language, Java Bibliography, Java Reference materials

” (LerJav)

abstract:

Java abstract keyword: “The Java abstract keyword is used to declare Java abstract methods and Java classes. An abstract method has no implementation defined; it is declared with Java arguments and a Java return type as usual, but the body enclosed in curly braces is replaced with a semicolon. The implementation of a Java abstract method is provided by a Java subclass of the Java class in which it is defined. If an abstract method appears in a class, the class is also abstract. Attempting to instantiate an abstract class will fail at compile time.” (LerJav)

annotations

Metadata added to Java source code using the @ tag syntax. Annotations can be used by the compiler or at runtime to augment classes, provide data or mappings, or flag additional services.

Ant

An older, XML-based build tool for Java applications. Ant builds can compile, package, and deploy Java source code as well as generate documentation and perform other activities through pluggable “targets.”

Application Programming Interface (API)

An API consists of the methods and variables programmers use to work with a component or tool in their applications. The Java language APIs consist of the classes and methods of the java.lang, java.util, java.io, java.text, java​.net packages and many others.

application

A Java program that runs standalone, as compared with an applet.

Annotation Processing Tool (APT)

A frontend for the Java compiler that processes annotations via a pluggable factory architecture, allowing users to implement custom compile-time annotations.

assertion

A language feature used to test for conditions that should be guaranteed by program logic. If a condition checked by an assertion is found to be false, a fatal error is thrown. For added performance, assertions can be disabled when an application is deployed.

atomic

Discrete or transactional in the sense that an operation happens as a unit, in an all-or-nothing fashion. Certain operations in the Java virtual machine (VM) and provided by the Java concurrency API are atomic.

Abstract Window Toolkit (AWT)

Java’s original platform-independent windowing, graphics, and UI toolkit.

Boojum

The mystical, spectral, alter ego of a Snark. From the 1876 Lewis Carroll poem “The Hunting of the Snark.”

Boolean

A primitive Java data type that contains a true or false value.

bounds

In Java generics, a limitation on the type of a type parameter. An upper bound specifies that a type must extend (or is assignable to) a specific Java class. A lower bound is used to indicate that a type must be a supertype of (or is assignable from) the specified type.

boxing

Wrapping of primitive types in Java by their object wrapper types. See also unboxing.

byte

A primitive Java data type that’s an 8-bit two’s-complement signed number.

callback

A behavior that is defined by one object and then later invoked by another object when a particular event occurs. The Java event mechanism is a kind of callback.

cast

The changing of the apparent type of a Java object from one type to another, specified type. Java casts are checked both statically by the Java compiler and at runtime.

catch

The Java catch statement introduces an exception-handling block of code following a try statement. The catch keyword is followed by one or more exception type and argument name pairs in parentheses and a block of code within curly braces.

certificate

An electronic document using a digital signature to assert the identity of a person, group, or organization. Certificates attest to the identity of a person or group and contain that organization’s public key. A certificate is signed by a certificate authority with its digital signature.

certificate authority (CA)

An organization that is entrusted to issue certificates, taking whatever steps are necessary to verify the real-world identity for which it is issuing the certificate.

char

A primitive Java data type; a variable of type char holds a single 16-bit Unicode character.

class

The fundamental unit that defines an object in most object-oriented programming languages. A class is an encapsulated collection of variables and methods that may have privileged access to one another. Usually a class can be instantiated to produce an object that’s an instance of the class, with its own unique set of data.

The class keyword is used to declare a class, thereby defining a new object type.

classloader

An instance of the class java.lang.ClassLoader, which is responsible for loading Java binary classes into the Java VM. Classloaders help partition classes based on their source for both structural and security purposes and can also be chained in a parent-child hierarchy.

class method

See static method.

classpath

The sequence of path locations specifying directories and archive files containing compiled Java class files and resources, which are searched in order to find components of a Java application.

class variable

See static variable.

client

The consumer of a resource or the party that initiates a conversation in the case of a networked client/server application. See also server.

Collections API

Classes in the core java.util package for working with and sorting structured collections or maps of items. This API includes the Vector and Hashtable classes as well as newer items such as List, Map, and Queue.

compilation unit

The unit of source code for a Java class. A compilation unit normally contains a single class definition and in most current development environments is simply a file with a .java extension.

compiler

A program that translates source code into executable code.

component architecture

A methodology for building parts of an application. It is a way to build reusable objects that can be easily assembled to form applications.

composition

Combining existing objects to create another, more complex object. When you compose a new object, you create complex behavior by delegating tasks to the internal objects. Composition is different from inheritance, which defines a new object by changing or refining the behavior of an old object. See also inheritance.

constructor

A special method that is invoked automatically when a new instance of a class is created. Constructors are used to initialize the variables of the newly created object. The constructor method has the same name as the class and no explicit return value.

content handler

A class that is called to parse a particular type of data and convert it to an appropriate object.

datagram

A packet of data normally sent using a connectionless protocol such as UDP, which provides no guarantees about delivery or error checking and provides no control information.

data hiding

See encapsulation.

deep copy

A duplicate of an object along with all of the objects that it references, transitively. A deep copy duplicates the entire “graph” of objects, instead of just duplicating references. See also shallow copy.

Document Object Model (DOM)

An in-memory representation of a fully parsed XML document using objects with names like Element, Attribute, and Text. The Java XML DOM API binding is standardized by the World Wide Web Consortium (W3C).

double

A Java primitive data type; a double value is a 64-bit (double-precision) floating-point number in IEEE-754 (binary64) binary format.

Document Type Definition (DTD)

A document containing specialized language that expresses constraints on the structure of XML tags and tag attributes. DTDs are used to validate an XML document, and can constrain the order and nesting of tags as well as the allowed values of attributes.

Enterprise JavaBeans (EJBs)

A server-side business component architecture named for, but not significantly related to, the JavaBeans component architecture. EJBs represent business services and database components, and provide declarative security and transactions.

encapsulation

The object-oriented programming technique of limiting the exposure of variables and methods to simplify the API of a class or package. Using the private and protected keywords, a programmer can limit the exposure of internal (“black box”) parts of a class. Encapsulation reduces bugs and promotes reusability and modularity of classes. This technique is also known as data hiding.

enum

The Java keyword for declaring an enumerated type. An enum holds a list of constant object identifiers that can be used as a type-safe alternative to numeric constants that serve as identifiers or labels.

enumeration

See enum.

erasure

The implementation technique used by Java generics in which generic type information is removed (erased) and distilled to raw Java types at compilation. Erasure provides backward compatibility with nongeneric Java code, but introduces some difficulties in the language.

event

A user’s action, such as a mouse-click or keypress.

The Java object delivered to a registered event listener in response to a user action or other activity in the system.

exception

A signal that some unexpected condition has occurred in the program. In Java, exceptions are objects that are subclasses of Exception or Error (which themselves are subclasses of Throwable). Exceptions in Java are “raised” with the throw keyword and handled with the catch keyword. See also catch, throw, and throws.

exception chaining

The design pattern of catching an exception and throwing a new, higher-level, or more appropriate exception that contains the underlying exception as its cause. The “cause” exception can be retrieved if necessary.

extends

A keyword used in a class declaration to specify the superclass of the class being defined. The class being defined has access to all the public and protected variables and methods of the superclass (or, if the class being defined is in the same package, it has access to all nonprivate variables and methods). If a class definition omits the extends clause, its superclass is taken to be java.lang.Object.

final

A keyword modifier that may be applied to classes, methods, and variables. It has a similar, but not identical, meaning in each case. When final is applied to a class, it means that the class may never be subclassed. java.lang.System is an example of a final class. A final method cannot be overridden in a subclass. When final is applied to a variable, the variable is a constant — that is, it can’t be modified. (The contents of a mutable object can still be changed; the final variable always points to the same object.)

finalize

A reserved method name. The finalize() method is called by the Java VM when an object is no longer being used (i.e., when there are no further references to it) but before the object’s memory is actually reclaimed by the system. Largely disfavored in light of newer approaches such as the Closeable interface and try-with-resources.

finally

A keyword that introduces the finally block of a try/catch/finally construct. catch and finally blocks provide exception handling and routine cleanup for code in a try block. The finally block is optional and appears after the try block, and after zero or more catch blocks. The code in a finally block is executed once, regardless of how the code in the try block executes. In normal execution, control reaches the end of the try block and proceeds to the finally block, which generally performs any necessary cleanup.

float

A Java primitive data type; a float value is a 32-bit (single-precision) floating-point number represented in IEEE 754 format.

garbage collection

The process of reclaiming the memory of objects no longer in use. An object is no longer in use when there are no references to it from other objects in the system and no references in any local variables on any thread’s method call stack.

generics

The syntax and implementation of parameterized types in the Java language, added in Java 5.0. Generic types are Java classes that are parameterized by the user on one or more additional Java types to specialize the behavior of the class. Generics are sometimes referred to as templates in other languages.

generic class

A class that uses the Java generics syntax and is parameterized by one or more type variables, which represent class types to be substituted by the user of the class. Generic classes are particularly useful for container objects and collections that can be specialized to operate on a specific type of element.

generic method

A method that uses the Java generics syntax and has one or more arguments or return types that refer to type variables representing the actual type of data element the method will use. The Java compiler can often infer the types of the type variables from the usage context of the method.

graphics context

A drawable surface represented by the java.awt.Graphics class. A graphics context contains contextual information about the drawing area and provides methods for performing drawing operations in it.

graphical user interface (GUI)

A traditional, visual user interface consisting of a window containing graphical items such as buttons, text fields, pull-down menus, dialog boxes, and other standard interface components.

hashcode

A random-looking identifying number, based on the data content of an object, used as a kind of signature for the object. A hashcode is used to store an object in a hash table (or hash map). See also hash table.

hash table

An object that is like a dictionary or an associative array. A hash table stores and retrieves elements using key values called hashcodes. See also hashcode.

hostname

The human-readable name given to an individual computer attached to the internet.

Hypertext Transfer Protocol (HTTP)

The protocol used by web browsers or other clients to talk to web servers. The simplest form of the protocol uses the commands GET to request a file and POST to send data.

Integrated Development Environment (IDE)

A GUI tool such as IntelliJ IDEA or Eclipse that provides source editing, compiling, running, debugging, and deployment functionality for developing Java applications.

implements

A keyword used in class declarations to indicate that the class implements the named interface or interfaces. The implements clause is optional in class declarations; if it appears, it must follow the extends clause (if any). If an implements clause appears in the declaration of a non-abstract class, every method from each specified interface must be implemented by the class or by one of its superclasses.

import

The import statement makes Java classes available to the current class under an abbreviated name or disambiguates classes imported in bulk by other import statements. (Java classes are always available by their fully qualified name, assuming the appropriate class file can be found relative to the CLASSPATH environment variable and that the class file is readable. import doesn’t make the class available; it just saves typing and makes your code more legible.) Any number of import statements may appear in a Java program. They must appear, however, after the optional package statement at the top of the file, and before the first class or interface definition in the file.

inheritance

An important feature of object-oriented programming that involves defining a new object by changing or refining the behavior of an existing object. Through inheritance, an object implicitly contains all of the non-private variables and methods of its superclass. Java supports single inheritance of classes and multiple inheritance of interfaces.

inner class

A class definition that is nested within another class or a method. An inner class functions within the lexical scope of another class.

instance

An occurrence of something, usually an object. When a class is instantiated to produce an object, we say the object is an instance of the class.

instance method

A non-static method of a class. Such a method is passed an implicit this reference to the object that invoked it. See also static, static method.

instanceof

A Java operator that returns true if the object on its left side is an instance of the class (or implements the interface) specified on its right side. instanceof returns false if the object isn’t an instance of the specified class or doesn’t implement the specified interface. It also returns false if the specified object is null.

instance variable

A non-static variable of a class. Each instance of a class has an independent copy of all of the instance variables of the class. See also class variable, static.

int

A primitive Java data type that’s a 32-bit two’s-complement signed number.

interface

A keyword used to declare an interface.

A collection of abstract methods that collectively define a type in the Java language. Classes implementing the methods may declare that they implement the interface type, and instances of them may be treated as that type.

internationalization

The process of making an application accessible to people who speak a variety of languages. Sometimes abbreviated I18N.

interpreter

The module that decodes and executes Java bytecode. Most Java bytecode is not, strictly speaking, interpreted any longer but compiled to native code dynamically by the Java VM.

introspection

The process by which a JavaBean provides additional information about itself, supplementing information learned by reflection.

ISO 8859-1

An 8-bit character encoding standardized by the ISO. This encoding is also known as Latin-1 and contains characters from the Latin alphabet suitable for English and most languages of western Europe.

JavaBeans

A component architecture for Java. It is a way to build interoperable Java objects that can be manipulated easily in a visual application builder environment.

Java beans

Java classes that are built following the JavaBeans design patterns and conventions.

JavaScript

A language developed early in the history of the web by Netscape for creating dynamic web pages. From a programmer’s point of view, it’s unrelated to Java, although some of its syntax is similar.

Java API for XML Binding (JAXB)

A Java API that allows for generation of Java classes from XML DTD or Schema descriptions and the generation of XML from Java classes.

Java API for XML Parsers (JAXP)

The Java API that allows for pluggable implementations of XML and XSL engines. This API provides an implementation-neutral way to construct parsers and transforms.

JAX-RPC

The Java API for XML Remote Procedure Calls, used by web services.

Java Database Connectivity (JDBC)

The standard Java API for talking to an SQL (Structured Query Language) database.

JDOM

A native Java XML DOM created by Jason Hunter and Brett McLaughlin. JDOM is easier to use than the standard DOM API for Java. It uses the Java Collections API and standard Java conventions. Available at the JDOM Project site.

Java Web Services Developer Pack (JDSDP)

A bundle of standard extension APIs packaged as a group with an installer from Sun. The JWSDP includes JAXB, JAX-RPC, and other XML and web services-related packages.

lambda (or lambda expression)

A compact way to put the entire definition of a small, anonymous function right where you are using it in the code.

Latin-1

A nickname for ISO 8859-1.

layout manager

An object that controls the arrangement of components within the display area of a Swing or AWT container.

lightweight component

A pure Java GUI component that has no native peer in the AWT.

local variable

A variable that is declared inside a method. A local variable can be seen only by code within that method.

Logging API

The Java API for structured logging and reporting of messages from within application components. The Logging API supports logging levels indicating the importance of messages, as well as filtering and output capabilities.

long

A primitive Java data type that’s a 64-bit two’s-complement signed number.

message digest

A cryptographically computed number based on the content of a message, used to determine whether the message’s contents have been changed in any way. A change to a message’s contents will change its message digest. When implemented properly, it is almost impossible to create two similar messages with the same digest.

method

The object-oriented programming term for a function or procedure.

method overloading

Provides definitions of more than one method with the same name but with different argument lists. When an overloaded method is called, the compiler determines which one is intended by examining the supplied argument types.

method overriding

Defines a method that matches the name and argument types of a method defined in a superclass. When an overridden method is invoked, the interpreter uses dynamic method lookup to determine which method definition is applicable to the current object. Beginning in Java 5.0, overridden methods can have different return types, with restrictions.

MIME (or MIME type)

A media type classification system often associated with email attachments or web page content.

Model-View-Controller (MVC) framework

A UI design that originated in Smalltalk. In MVC, the data for a display item is called the model. A view displays a particular representation of the model, and a controller provides user interaction with both. Java incorporates many MVC concepts.

modifier

A keyword placed before a class, variable, or method that alters the item’s accessibility, behavior, or semantics. See also abstract, final, native method, private, protected, public, static, synchronized.

NaN (not-a-number)

This is a special value of the double and float data types that represents an undefined result of a mathematical operation, such as zero divided by zero.

native method

A method that is implemented in a native language on a host platform, rather than being implemented in Java. Native methods provide access to such resources as the network, the windowing system, and the host filesystem.

new

A unary operator that creates a new object or array (or raises an OutOfMemoryException if there is not enough memory available).

NIO

The Java “new” I/O package. A core package introduced in Java 1.4 to support asynchronous, interruptible, and scalable I/O operations. The NIO API supports nonthreadbound “select” style I/O handling.

null

null is a special value that indicates that a reference-type variable doesn’t refer to any object instance. Static and instance variables of classes default to the value null if not otherwise assigned.

object

The fundamental structural unit of an object-oriented programming language, encapsulating a set of data and behavior that operates on that data.

An instance of a class, having the structure of the class but its own copy of data elements. See also instance.

” (LerJav)

Sources:

Fair Use Sources:

Categories
Software Engineering

YouTube

The YouTube logo is made of a red round-rectangular box with a white "play" button inside and the word "YouTube" written in black.
Type of businessSubsidiary
Type of siteVideo hosting service
FoundedFebruary 14, 2005; 16 years ago
Headquarters901 Cherry Avenue
San Bruno, California, United States
Area servedWorldwide (excluding blocked countries)
Founder(s)Chad HurleySteve ChenJawed Karim
Key peopleSusan Wojcicki (CEO)
Chad Hurley (advisor)
IndustryInternetVideo hosting service
ProductsYouTube Premium
YouTube Music
YouTube TV
YouTube Kids
RevenueUS$15 billion (2019)[1]
ParentGoogle LLC (2006–present)
URLYouTube.com
(see list of localized domain names)
AdvertisingGoogle AdSense
RegistrationOptionalNot required to watch most videos; required for certain tasks such as uploading videos, viewing flagged (18+) videos, creating playlists, liking or disliking videos, and posting comments
Users2 billion (October 2020)[2]
LaunchedFebruary 14, 2005; 16 years ago
Current statusActive
Content licenseUploader holds copyright (standard license); Creative Commons can be selected.
Written inPython (core/API),[3] C (through CPython), C++Java (through Guice platform),[4][5] Go,[6] JavaScript (UI)

YouTube is an American online video-sharing platform headquartered in San Bruno, California. The service, created in February 2005 by three former PayPal employees—Chad HurleySteve Chen, and Jawed Karim—was bought by Google in November 2006 for US$1.65 billion and now operates as one of the company’s subsidiaries. YouTube is the second most-visited website after Google Search, according to Alexa Internet rankings.[7]

YouTube allows users to upload, view, rate, share, add to playlists, report, comment on videos, and subscribe to other users. Available content includes video clipsTV show clips, music videosshort and documentary films, audio recordings, movie trailerslive streamsvideo blogging, short original videos, and educational videos. Most content is generated and uploaded by individuals, but media corporations including CBS, the BBCVevo, and Hulu offer some of their material via YouTube as part of the YouTube partnership program. Unregistered users can watch, but not upload, videos on the site, while registered users can upload an unlimited number of videos and add comments. Age-restricted videos are available only to registered users affirming themselves to be at least 18 years old.

As of May 2019, there were more than 500 hours of content uploaded to YouTube each minute and one billion hours of content being watched on YouTube every day.[8] YouTube and selected creators earn advertising revenue from Google AdSense, a program that targets ads according to site content and audience. The vast majority of videos are free to view, but there are exceptions, including subscription-based premium channels, film rentals, as well as YouTube Music and YouTube Premium, subscription services respectively offering premium and ad-free music streaming, and ad-free access to all content, including exclusive content commissioned from notable personalities. Based on reported quarterly advertising revenue, YouTube is estimated to have US$15 billion in annual revenues.

Further reading

External links

Categories

” (WP)

Sources:

Fair Use Sources:

Categories
Software Engineering

Twitter – Tweeting – Tweeted

“Tweeting” and “Tweeted” redirect here. 

Twitter bird logo 2012.svg
Type of businessPublic
Type of siteNewssocial networking service
Available inMultilingual
Traded asNYSETWTRS&P 500 Component
FoundedMarch 21, 2006; 14 years ago
HeadquartersSan Francisco, California United States
Area servedWorldwide
Founder(s)Jack DorseyNoah GlassBiz StoneEvan Williams
Key peopleOmid Kordestani(Executive Chairman)[1]Ned Segal (CFO)Jack Dorsey (CEO)Parag Agrawal (CTO)
IndustryInternet3.72
RevenueDecrease US$3.72 billion (2020)
Operating incomeDecrease US27 million (2020)
Net incomeDecrease US$-1.13 billion (2020)
Total assetsIncrease US$13.37 billion (2020)
Total equityDecrease US$7.97 billion (2020)
Employees4,600 (September 2019)[2]
SubsidiariesVinePeriscopeMoPub
URLtwitter.com 
RegistrationRequired
Users330 million monthly active users(Q1 2019)
LaunchedJuly 15, 2006; 14 years ago
Current statusActive
Native client(s) oniOSAndroidWindows PhoneMicrosoft WindowsMacOSWeb
Written inJavaRubyScalaJavaScript
[3][4][5][6][7][8][9][10][11][12]

Twitter is an American microblogging and social networking service on which users post and interact with messages known as “tweets”. Registered users can post, like and retweet tweets, but unregistered users can only read them. Users access Twitter through its website interface or its mobile-device application software (“app”), though the service could also be accessed via SMS before April 2020.[13] Twitter, Inc. is based in San FranciscoCalifornia, and has more than 25 offices around the world.[14] Tweets were originally restricted to 140 characters, but was doubled to 280 for non-CJK languages in November 2017.[15] Audio and video tweets remain limited to 140 seconds for most accounts.

Twitter was created by Jack DorseyNoah GlassBiz Stone, and Evan Williams in March 2006 and launched in July of that year. By 2012, more than 100 million users posted 340 million tweets a day,[16] and the service handled an average of 1.6 billion search queries per day.[17][18][19] In 2013, it was one of the ten most-visited websites and has been described as “the SMS of the Internet”.[20] As of Q1 2019, Twitter had more than 330 million monthly active users.[10] Twitter is a some-to-many microblogging service, given that the vast majority of tweets are written by a small minority of users.[21][22]

Categories

” (WP)

Sources:

Fair Use Sources:

Categories
JavaScript React Software Engineering

React.js Bibliography

See also: Awesome React, React Frameworks built on the React Library, React library, JavaScript, JavaScript Library and Framework Bibliography

Books on React.js:

Sources:

Fair Use Sources:

Categories
Apple macOS Operating Systems Software Engineering

macOS – OSX – OS X

This article is about the current Apple operating system for Mac computers. For pre-2001 versions, see Classic Mac OS.

MacOS wordmark (2017).svg
DeveloperApple Inc.
Written inCC++[1]Objective-CSwift[2]assembly language
OS familyUnixMacintosh
Working stateCurrent
Source modelClosed source (with open source components)
Initial releaseMarch 24, 2001; 19 years ago
Latest release11.2.3[3] (20D91)[4] (March 8, 2021; 1 day ago) [±]
Latest preview11.3 beta 3[5] (20E5196f)[6] (March 2, 2021; 7 days ago) [±]
Marketing targetPersonal computing
Available in39 languages[7]
List of languages[as of macOS Catalina]: Arabic, Catalan, Croatian, Chinese (Hong Kong), Chinese (Simplified), Chinese (Traditional), Czech, Danish, Dutch, English (Australia), English (United Kingdom), English (United States), Finnish, French (Canada), French (France), German, Greek, Hebrew, Hindi, Hungarian, Indonesian, Italian, Japanese, Korean, Malay, Norwegian, Polish, Portuguese (Brazil), Portuguese (Portugal), Romanian, Russian, Slovak, Spanish (Latin America), Spanish (Spain), Swedish, Thai, Turkish, Ukrainian, Vietnamese
Update methodSystem Preferences (10.14–)Mac App Store (10.810.13.6)Software Update (10.010.7.5)
PlatformsARM64 (11.0–)x86-64 (10.4.7–)IA-32 (10.4.410.6.8)PowerPC (10.010.5.8)
Kernel typeHybrid (XNU)
Default user interfaceAqua (Graphical)
LicenseCommercial softwareproprietary software
Preceded byClassic Mac OSNeXTSTEP
Official websitewww.apple.com/macos
Support status
Supported

macOS (/ˌmækoʊˈɛs/;[8] previously Mac OS X and later OS X) is a series of proprietary graphical operating systems developed and marketed by Apple Inc. since 2001. It is the primary operating system for Apple’s Mac computers. Within the market of desktop, laptop and home computers, and by web usage, it is the second most widely used desktop OS, after Microsoft Windows.[9][10]” (WP)

“macOS is the direct successor to the classic Mac OS, the line of Macintosh operating systems with nine releases from 1984 to 1999. macOS adopted the Unix kernel and inherited technologies developed between 1985 and 1997 at NeXT, the company that Apple co-founder Steve Jobs created after leaving Apple in 1985. Releases from Mac OS X 10.5 Leopard[11] and thereafter are UNIX 03 certified.[12] Apple’s mobile operating system, iOS, has been considered a variant of macOS.[13]” (WP)

“The first desktop version, Mac OS X 10.0, was released in March 2001, with its first update, 10.1, arriving later that year. The “X” in Mac OS X and OS X is the Roman numeral for the number 10 and is pronounced as such. The X was a prominent part of the operating system’s brand identity and marketing in its early years, but gradually receded in prominence since the release of Snow Leopard in 2009. Apple began naming its releases after big cats, which lasted until OS X 10.8 Mountain Lion. Since OS X 10.9 Mavericks, releases have been named after locations in California.[14] Apple shortened the name to “OS X” in 2012 and then changed it to “macOS” in 2016, adopting the nomenclature that they were using for their other operating systems, iOSwatchOS, and tvOS. With Big Sur, Apple advanced the macOS major version number for the first time, changing it to 11 for Big Sur from the 10 used for all previous releases.” (WP)

“macOS has supported three major processor architectures. It first supported PowerPC-based Macs in 1999. Starting in 2006, with the Mac transition to Intel processors, it ran on Macs using Intel x86 processors. Most recently, starting in 2020, with the Mac transition to Apple Silicon, it runs on Macs using 64-bit ARM-based Apple Silicon processors.” (WP)

Sources:

Fair Use Sources:

Categories
Cloud DevOps Software Engineering

GitHub

Font Awesome 5 brands github.svg
GitHub logo 2013.svg
Type of businessSubsidiary
Type of siteCollaborative version control
Available inEnglish
FoundedFebruary 8, 2008; 13 years ago (as Logical Awesome LLC)
HeadquartersSan Francisco, California, United States
Area servedWorldwide
Founder(s)Tom Preston-WernerChris WanstrathP. J. HyettScott Chacon
CEONat Friedman
Key peopleMike Taylor (CFO)
IndustryCollaborative version control (GitHub)
Blog host (GitHub Pages)
Package repository (NPM)
Employees1677[1]
ParentMicrosoft
URLgithub.com 
RegistrationOptional (required for creating and joining repositories)
Users56 million (Sep 2020)
LaunchedApril 10, 2008; 12 years ago
Current statusActive
Written inRuby
ECMAScript
Go
C [2]

GitHub, Inc. is a provider of Internet hosting for software development and version control using Git. It offers the distributed version control and source code management (SCM) functionality of Git, plus its own features. It provides access control and several collaboration features such as bug trackingfeature requests, task managementcontinuous integration and wikis for every project.[3] Headquartered in California, it has been a subsidiary of Microsoft since 2018.[4]

GitHub offers its basic services free of charge. Its more advanced professional and enterprise services are commercial.[5] Free GitHub accounts are commonly used to host open-source projects.[6] As of January 2019, GitHub offers unlimited private repositories to all plans, including free accounts, but allowed only up to three collaborators per repository for free.[7] Starting from April 15, 2020, the free plan allows unlimited collaborators, but restricts private repositories to 2,000 minutes of GitHub Actions[8] per month.[9] As of January 2020, GitHub reports having over 40 million users[10] and more than 190 million repositories[11] (including at least 28 million public repositories),[12] making it the largest host of source code in the world.[13]

History

GitHub at AWS Summit

The GitHub service was developed by Chris WanstrathP. J. HyettTom Preston-Werner and Scott Chacon using Ruby on Rails, and started in February 2008. The company, GitHub, Inc., has existed since 2007 and is located in San Francisco.[14]The shading of the map illustrates the number of users as a proportion of each country’s Internet population. The circular charts surrounding the two hemispheres depict the total number of GitHub users (left) and commits (right) per country.

On February 24, 2009, GitHub announced that within the first year of being online, GitHub had accumulated over 46,000 public repositories, 17,000 of which were formed in the previous month. At that time, about 6,200 repositories had been forked at least once and 4,600 had been merged.

That same year, the site was harnessed by over 100,000 users, according to Github, and had grown to host 90,000 unique public repositories, 12,000 having been forked at least once, for a total of 135,000 repositories.[15]

In 2010, GitHub was hosting 1 million repositories.[16] A year later, this number doubled.[17] ReadWriteWeb reported that GitHub had surpassed SourceForge and Google Code in total number of commits for the period of January to May 2011.[18] On January 16, 2013, GitHub passed the 3 million users mark and was then hosting more than 5 million repositories.[19] By the end of the year, the number of repositories were twice as much, reaching 10 million repositories.[20]

In 2012, GitHub raised $100 million in funding from Andreessen Horowitz with $750 million valuation.[21] Peter Levine, general partner at Andreessen Horowitz, stated that GitHub had been growing revenue at 300% annually since 2008 “profitably nearly the entire way”.[22] On July 29, 2015, GitHub stated it had raised $250 million in funding in a round led by Sequoia Capital. Other investors of that round included Andreessen Horowitz, Thrive Capital, and IVP (Institutional Venture Partners).[23] The round valued the company at approximately $2 billion.[24]

In 2015, GitHub opened an office in Japan that is its first office outside of the U.S.[25] In 2016, GitHub was ranked No. 14 on the Forbes Cloud 100 list.[26] It has not been featured on the 2018, 2019 and 2020 lists.[27]

On February 28, 2018, GitHub fell victim to the third largest distributed denial-of-service (DDoS) attack in history, with incoming traffic reaching a peak of about 1.35 terabits per second.[28]

On June 19, 2018, GitHub expanded its GitHub Education by offering free education bundles to all schools.[29][30]

Acquisition by Microsoft

From 2012 Microsoft became a significant user of GitHub, using it to host open-source projects and development tools such as .NET CoreChakra CoreMSBuildPowerShellPowerToysVisual Studio CodeWindows CalculatorWindows Terminal and the bulk of its product documentation (now to be found on Microsoft Docs).[31][32]

On June 4, 2018, Microsoft announced its intent to acquire GitHub for US$7.5 billion. The deal closed on October 26, 2018.[33] GitHub continued to operate independently as a community, platform and business.[34] Under Microsoft, the service was led by Xamarin‘s Nat Friedman, reporting to Scott Guthrie, executive vice president of Microsoft Cloud and AI. GitHub’s CEO, Chris Wanstrath, was retained as a “technical fellow”, also reporting to Guthrie.

There have been concerns from developers Kyle Simpson, JavaScript trainer and author, and Rafael Laguna, CEO at Open-Xchange over Microsoft’s purchase, citing uneasiness over Microsoft’s handling of previous acquisitions, such as Nokia’s mobile business or Skype.[35][36]

This acquisition was in line with Microsoft’s business strategy under CEO Satya Nadella, which has seen a larger focus on the cloud computing services, alongside development of and contributions to open-source software.[37][4][32] Harvard Business Review argued that Microsoft was intending to acquire GitHub to get access to its user base, so it can be used as a loss leader to encourage use of its other development products and services.[38]

Concerns over the sale bolstered interest in competitors: Bitbucket (owned by Atlassian), GitLab (a commercial open source product that also runs a hosted service version) and SourceForge (owned by BIZX, LLC) reported that they had seen spikes in new users intending to migrate projects from GitHub to their respective services.[39][40][41][42]

In September 2019, GitHub acquired Semmle, a code analysis tool.[43] In February 2020, GitHub launched in India under the name GitHub India Private Limited.[44] In March 2020, GitHub announced that they were acquiring npm, a JavaScript packaging vendor, for an undisclosed sum of money.[45] The deal was closed on 15 April 2020.[46]

In early July 2020, the GitHub Archive Program was established, to archive its open source code in perpetuity.[47]

Services

GitHub.com

Development of the GitHub.com platform began on October 19, 2007.[60][61][62] The site was launched in April 2008 by Tom Preston-Werner, Chris Wanstrath, P. J. Hyett and Scott Chacon after it had been made available for a few months prior as a beta release.[63]

Projects on GitHub.com can be accessed and managed using the standard Git command-line interface; all standard Git commands work with it. GitHub.com also allows users to browse public repositories on the site. Multiple desktop clients and Git plugins are also available. The site provides social networking-like functions such as feeds, followers, wikis (using wiki software called Gollum) and a social network graph to display how developers work on their versions (“forks“) of a repository and what fork (and branch within that fork) is newest.

Anyone can browse and download public repositories but only registered users can contribute content to repositories. With a registered user account, users are able to have discussions, manage repositories, submit contributions to others’ repositories, and review changes to code. GitHub.com began offering unlimited private repositories at no cost in January 2019 (limited to three contributors per project). Previously, only public repositories were free.[64][65][66] On April 14, 2020, GitHub made “all of the core GitHub features” free for everyone, including “private repositories with unlimited collaborators”.[67]

The fundamental software that underpins GitHub is Git itself, written by Linus Torvalds, creator of Linux. The additional software that provides the GitHub user interface was written using Ruby on Rails and Erlang by GitHub, Inc. developers Wanstrath,[68] Hyett, and Preston-Werner.

Scope

The main purpose of GitHub.com is to facilitate the version control and issue tracking aspects of software development. Labels, milestones, responsibility assignment, and a search engine are available for issue tracking. For version control, Git (and by extension GitHub.com) allows pull requests to propose changes to the source code. Users with the ability to review the proposed changes can see a diff of the requested changes and approve them. In Git terminology, this action is called “committing” and one instance of it is a “commit”. A history of all commits are kept and can be viewed at a later time.

In addition, GitHub supports the following formats and features:

  • Documentation, including automatically rendered README files in a variety of Markdown-like file formats (see README § On GitHub)
  • Wikis
  • GitHub Actions, which allows building continuous integration and continuous deployment pipelines for testing, releasing and deploying software without the use of third-party websites/platforms
  • Graphs: pulse, contributors, commits, code frequency, punch card, network, members
  • Integrations Directory[69]
  • Email notifications
  • Discussions
  • Option to subscribe someone to notifications by @ mentioning them.[70]
  • Emojis[71]
  • Nested task-lists within files
  • Visualization of geospatial data
  • 3D render files that can be previewed using a new integrated STL file viewer that displays the files on a “3D canvas”.[72] The viewer is powered by WebGL and Three.js.
  • Photoshop’s native PSD format can be previewed and compared to previous versions of the same file.
  • PDF document viewer
  • Security Alerts of known Common Vulnerabilities and Exposures in different packages

GitHub’s Terms of Service do not require public software projects hosted on GitHub to meet the Open Source Definition. The terms of service state, “By setting your repositories to be viewed publicly, you agree to allow others to view and fork your repositories.”[73]

GitHub Enterprise

GitHub Enterprise is a self-managed version of GitHub.com with similar functionality. It can be run on an organization’s own hardware or on a cloud provider, and it has been available since November 2011.[74] In November 2020, source code for GitHub Enterprise Server was leaked online in apparent protest against DMCA takedown of YouTube-dl. According to GitHub, the source code came from GitHub accidentally sharing the code with Enterprise customers themselves, not from an attack on GitHub servers.[75][76]

GitHub Pages

GitHub Pages is a static web hosting service offered by GitHub since 2008 to GitHub users for hosting user blogs, project documentation,[77][78] or even whole books created as a page.[79]

All GitHub Pages content is stored in a Git repository, either as files served to visitors verbatim or in Markdown format. GitHub is seamlessly integrated with Jekyll static web site and blog generator and GitHub continuous integration pipelines. Each time the content source is updated, Jekyll regenerates the website and automatically serves it via GitHub Pages infrastructure.[80]

As with the rest of GitHub, it includes both free and paid tiers of service, instead of being supported by web advertising. Web sites generated through this service are hosted either as subdomains of the github.io domain, or as custom domains bought through a third-party domain name registrar.[81] When custom domain is set on a GitHub Pages repo a Let’s Encrypt certificate for it is generated automatically. Once the certificate has been generated Enforce HTTPS can be set for the repository’s website to transparently redirect all HTTP requests to HTTPS.[82][83]

Gist

GitHub also operates other services: a pastebin-style site called Gist[63] that is for hosting code snippets (GitHub proper is for hosting larger projects).

Tom Preston-Werner presented the then-new Gist feature at a punk rock Ruby conference in 2008.[84] Gist builds on the traditional simple concept of a pastebin by adding version control for code snippets, easy forking, and TLS encryption for private pastes. Because each “gist” has its own Git repository, multiple code snippets can be contained in a single paste and they can be pushed and pulled using Git. Further, forked code can be pushed back to the original author in the form of a patch, so gists (pastes) can become more like mini-projects.[citation needed]

Before February 18, 2018, unregistered users were able to upload text to the site. Since then, uploading gists has been deactivated for unregistered users with the aim to mitigate spamming.[85]

Education program

GitHub launched a new program called the GitHub Student Developer Pack to give students free access to popular development tools and services. GitHub partnered with BitnamiCrowdflowerDigitalOceanDNSimpleHackHandsNamecheap, Orchestrate, Screenhero, SendGridStripeTravis CI and Unreal Engine to launch the program.[86]

In 2016 GitHub announced the launch of the GitHub Campus Experts program[87] to train and encourage students to grow technology communities at their universities. The Campus Experts program is open to university students of 18 years and older across the world.[88] GitHub Campus Experts are one of the primary ways that GitHub funds student oriented events and communities, Campus Experts are given access to training, funding, and additional resources to run events and grow their communities. To become a Campus Expert applicants must complete an online training course consisting of multiple modules designed to grow community leadership skills.

GitHub Marketplace service

GitHub also provides some software as a service integrations for adding extra features to projects. Those services include:

  • Waffle.io: Project management for software teams. Automatically see pull requests, automated builds, reviews, and deployments across all of your repositories in GitHub.
  • Rollbar: Integrate with GitHub to provide real time debugging tools and full-stack exception reporting. It is compatible with all well used code languages, such as JavaScriptPython.NETRubyPHPNode.jsAndroidiOSGoJava, and C#.
  • Codebeat: For automated code analysis specialized in web and mobile developers. The supported languages for this software are: ElixirGoJavaSwiftJavaScriptPythonRubyKotlinObjective-C, and TypeScript.
  • Travis CI: To provide confidence for your apps while doing test and ship. Also gives full control over the build environment, to adapt it to the code. Supported languages: GoJavaJavaScriptObjective-CPythonPHPRuby, and Swift.
  • GitLocalize: Developed for teams that are translating their content from one point to another. GitLocalize automatically syncs with your repository so you can keep your workflow on GitHub. It also keeps you updated on what needs to be translated.

GitHub Sponsors

GitHub Sponsors allows users to make monthly money donations to projects hosted on GitHub.[89] The public beta was announced on May 23, 2019 and currently the project accepts wait list registrations. The Verge said that GitHub Sponsors “works exactly like Patreon” because “developers can offer various funding tiers that come with different perks, and they’ll receive recurring payments from supporters who want to access them and encourage their work” except with “zero fees to use the program”. Furthermore, GitHub offer incentives for early adopters during the first year: it pledges to cover payment processing costs, and match sponsorship payments up to $5,000 per developer. Furthermore, users still can use other similar services like Patreon and Open Collective and link to their own websites.[90][91]

GitHub Archive Program

In July 2020, GitHub stored a February archive of the site[47] in an abandoned mountain mine in Svalbard, Norway, part of the Arctic World Archive and not far from the Svalbard Global Seed Vault. The archive contained the code of all active public repositories, as well as that of dormant, but significant public repositories. The 21TB of data was stored on piqlFilm archival film reels as QR codes, and is expected to last 500–1,000 years.[92][93][94][95]

The GitHub Archive Program is also working with partners on Project Silica, in an attempt to store all public repositories for 10,000 years. It aims to write archives into the molecular structure of quartz glass platters, using a high-precision laser that pulses a quadrillion (1,000,000,000,000,000) times per second.[95]

Developed projects

  • Atom, a free and open-source text and source code editor
  • Electron, an open-source framework to use JavaScript-based websites as desktop applications.

Prominent users

Some prominent open source organizations and projects use GitHub as a primary place for collaboration, including:

See also

Categories

” (WP)

Sources:

Fair Use Sources:

Categories
Software Engineering

Outline of computer programming

“The following outline is provided as an overview of and topical guide to computer programming:” (WP)

Computer programming – process that leads from an original formulation of a computing problem to executable computer programs. Programming involves activities such as analysis, developing understanding, generating algorithmsverification of requirements of algorithms including their correctness and resources consumption, and implementation (commonly referred to as coding[1][2]) of algorithms in a target programming languageSource code is written in one or more programming languages. The purpose of programming is to find a sequence of instructions that will automate performing a specific task or solving a given problem.” (WP)

History

Platforms

Further information: Computing platform

Paradigms

Further information: Programming paradigm

Writing programs

Methodology

Further information: Programming style

Algorithms

Further information: Algorithm

Programming languages

Programming language – formal constructed language designed to communicate instructions to a machine, particularly a computer. Programming languages can be used to create programs to control the behavior of a machine or to express algorithms.” (WP)

Types of programming languages

Further information: Programming paradigm

Popular languages

The top 20 most popular programming languages as of February 2021:[3]

  1. C
  2. Java
  3. Python
  4. C++
  5. C#
  6. Visual Basic .NET
  7. JavaScript
  8. PHP
  9. SQL
  10. Assembly language
  11. R
  12. Groovy
  13. Go
  14. Ruby
  15. Swift
  16. MATLAB
  17. Delphi/Object Pascal
  18. Classic Visual Basic
  19. Perl
  20. Objective-C

Anatomy of a programming language

Comparisons of programming languages

Programming language comparisons

Comparisons of individual languages

Compilation

Further information: Compiler

Software

Further information: Computer software

Components

Software development

Software engineering

Software engineering –

See also

Sources:

Fair Use Sources: