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Bibliography Buddha-Dharma-Sangha Buddhist Ayurvedic Medicine

Ayurveda: The Science of Self Healing – A Practical Guide, by Vasant Lad

Ayurveda: The Science of Self Healing – A Practical Guide, by Vasant Lad

Fair Use Source: B001TH78SK (ASSH)

For the first time a book is available which clearly explains the principles and practical applications of Ayurveda, the oldest healing system in the world. This beautifully illustrated text thoroughly explains the following:

history & philosophy * basic principles, * diagnostic techniques * treatment * diet * medicinal usage of kitchen herbs & spices * first aid * first aid * food antidotes * and much more

More than 50 concise charts, diagrams and tables are included, as well as a glossary and index in order to further clarify the text.

Book Details

  • ASIN: B001TH78SK
  • Publisher: Lotus Press; 2nd edition (November 30, 1984)
  • Publication date: November 30, 1984
  • Print length: 176 pages

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The Complete Book of Ayurvedic Home Remedies, by Vasant Lad

See The Complete Book of Ayurvedic Home Remedies: Based on the Timeless Wisdom of India‘s 5,000-Year-Old Medical System, by Vasant Lad

Fair Use Source: B00735H9FY (BAHR)

Based on the ancient healing tradition from India that dates back thousands of years, The Complete Book of Ayurvedic Home Remedies offers natural alternatives to conventional medicines and treatments with practical advice and easy-to-follow instructions.

Dr. Vasant Lad, a leading authority in this field, has created an invaluable guide to treating common ailments and chronic problems with strategies tailored to your personal needs based on your dosha. Dr. Lad first explains the principles behind the science of Ayurveda, exploring the physical and psychological characteristics of each of the three doshas, or mind-body types–vata, pitta, and kapha. Once you have determined which type or combination of types you are, Dr. Lad helps you to begin your journey to the ultimate “state of balance” and well-being.

Dr. Lad explains why certain imbalances often result in illness and shows you how to restore your body to natural order. You’ll learn which traditional Ayurvedic remedies–herbal teas and formulas, essential oils, meditation, yoga–offer relief from a variety of conditions, such as cold and flu symptoms, headaches, toothaches, sore throats, high cholesterol, vision problems, anxiety, and depression. Dr. Lad also shows you how to use diet and specific Ayurvedic techniques to prevent future illness and to promote body consciousness and healthy living.

The Complete Book of Ayurvedic Home Remedies enables us all to experience the benefits of Ayurveda’s healing properties that have been refined over thousands of years. All of the herbs, foods, and oils Dr. Lad recommends can be found in local health food stores or through mail-order catalogs. Complete with an extensive glossary and resource list, this is the definitive guide to natural, safe, and effective remedies, everyday keys to a lifetime of vitality and well-being.

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Textbook of Ayurveda, Volume 2 – A Complete Guide to Clinical Assessment, by Vasant Lad

Textbook of Ayurveda, Volume 2 – A Complete Guide to Clinical Assessment, by Vasant Lad, 978-1883725112 (ToA2)

Vasant Lad presents this ages-old science in a framework that is clearly accessible to the modern student while remaining true to its ancient roots, clarifying the mysteries of Ayurveda from the classical Sanskrit texts. This text builds upon the information in Volume One, imparting the essential elements of clinical assessment. Vasant Lad describes the many categories and stages of disorders and disease from the ancient texts of Ayurveda. He then shows you how to detect and evaluate the conditions of the client. Offering a thorough training in client assessment, the reader will come away with a new level of expertise in service to and knowledge of one s patient. Knowing precisely where the client is in the disease process enables the clinician to determine the most effective level of care necessary for them. Filled with illustrations, tables, charts, clinical forms and practical examples, this book will lead the student through the methods of assessment using the historical applications of Ayurveda as well as more modern terms and techniques. * Discover in-depth techniques of assessment that include the five clinical barometers, three categories of clinical examination, eight methods of clinical examination, constitutional assessment and assessment of agni and metabolic waste. * Outlined as well are detailed and specialized information on disorders of the doshas, tissues, prana, tejas, ojas and the bodily channels. * Gain new understanding of the disease process, its stage of progression and the subtleties of the inner workings of the body. * Included are assessment forms for a full patient evaluation. These are the very methods used by Dr. Lad in his clinics.

Book Details

  • Publisher: The Ayurvedic Press; 1st edition (January 31, 2007)
  • Hardcover: 416 pages
  • ISBN-10: 1883725119
  • ISBN-13 : 978-1883725112

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Bibliography Buddha-Dharma-Sangha Buddhist Ayurvedic Medicine History

Textbook of Ayurveda, Volume 1 – Fundamental Principles of Ayurveda, by Vasant Lad

Textbook of Ayurveda, Volume 1 – Fundamental Principles of Ayurveda, by Vasant Lad, 978-1883725075 (ToA1)

In his Ayurvedic Studies Program, Vasant Lad, Ayurvedic Physician, teaches Ayurveda as a science of moment-to-moment living. Each lecture that he gives flows from his own heart in a river of healing wisdom that is inspired by and pertinent to the students who are present at the time of the lecture.

This textbook is a presentation of Dr. Lad’s years of teaching in that classroom setting. It conveys the philosophical and fundamental principles of his first year Ayurvedic Studies Program at the Ayurvedic Institute in a dynamic and inspirational way. This book will give the student a detailed foundation upon which to pursue deeper knowledge, including that of the future volumes in this series.

Book Details

  • Publisher: Ayurvedic Press; 1st edition (November 11, 2001)
  • Hardcover: 334 pages
  • ISBN-10: 1883725070
  • ISBN-13: 978-1883725075

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Bibliography Buddha-Dharma-Sangha Buddhist Ayurvedic Medicine History

Textbook of Ayurveda, Volume 3 – General Principles of Management and Treatment, by Vasant Lad

See Textbook of Ayurveda, Volume Three: General Principles of Management and Treatment, by Vasant Lad

Fair Use Source: 978-1883725143 (ToA3)

This book brings forth the practices of Ayurveda from the ancient texts and presents them in a systematic organization that is readily accessible to a Western audience. Vasant Lad provides comprehensive information on therapeutic modalities including diet and lifestyle recommendations, palliative and cleansing therapies, subtle healing methods including individual rejuvenation protocols, yoga and pranayama practices, and herbal substances as well as management techniques according to dosha, dhatu, srotamsi, and the subtle essences. Each section clearly explains the principles of the healing techniques, often with the steps outlined for the reader, in addition to the herbal substances and their practical application. It is an essential reference for the Ayurvedic practitioner.

One of Dr. Lad’s favorite sutras from Charaka says that a true physician knows the body, mind, thoughts, feelings, and consciousness of the patient. Unless you enter the heart of your patient with the light of awareness, knowledge, compassion, and insight, you will not be able to diagnose their problem and treat the person accordingly.

Dr. Lad’s students from all over the world learn Ayurveda, step by patient step, grounding their knowledge in the principles of a system that pre-dates Western medical concepts by thousands of years. Next, they learn the sophisticated methods of evaluation that Ayurveda provides. Mastering these techniques takes practice and dedication. The previous steps, well practiced, have prepared the student to enter into the next stage, where they can stand beside the client and guide them on their journey of healing.

Book Details

  • Publisher: The Ayurvedic Press; 1st edition (April 16, 2012)
  • Hardcover: 668 pages
  • ISBN-10: 1883725143
  • ISBN-13: 978-1883725143

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Categories
Bibliography Buddha-Dharma-Sangha Buddhist Ayurvedic Medicine History

Bibliography of Buddhist Ayurvedic Medicine

What is AyurvedaBuddhist Ayurvedic Medicine, Seven Dhatus – Bodily Tissues,  Srotamsi – Bodily Channels and Bodily Systems, Buddhist Ayurvedic Nutrition and Food Therapy

Selected Readings

Classical texts:  Caraka Samhita                                 Sharngadhara Samhita              Kashyapa Samhita

                           Sushruta Samhita                               Madhava Nidanam                   Bhela Samhita

                           Vagbhatta Samhita                             Bhava Prakasha

Modern Authors / Commentators on Ayurveda

Vasant Lad:                   

  • The Science of Self Healing
  • The Yoga of Herbs
  • Textbook of Ayurveda – Fundamental Principles
  • Secrets of the Pulse
  • The Complete Book of Ayurvedic Home Remedies

Deepak Chopra:

  • Creating Health
  • Perfect Health
  • Return of the Rishi
  • Unconditional Life
  • Quantum Healing
  • Ageless Body Timeless Mind

David Frawley:

  • Ayurvedic Healing
  • Ayurveda And The Mind: the Healing of Consciousness

Sharma:

  • Freedom from Disease
  • Realms of Ayurveda

Lonsdorf:

  • A Woman’s Best Medicine

Robert Svoboda:

  • Prakruti
  • Life, Health, and Longevity
  • Hidden Secrets
  • Light on Life (Vedic Astrology)
  • Aghora I
  • Aghora II / Kundalini

Kasture:

  • Concept of Ayurveda for Health and Longevity

John Douillard:

  • Body, Mind and Sport

OTHER READINGS:

Shrimad Bhagavad Gita        The Upanishads      The Brahma Sutras       The Vedanta Sutras of Badarayana

The Yoga Sutras of Patanjali

Maharishi Mahesh Yogi:  Bhagavad Gita and Commentary Chs. 1-6           The Science of Being

Paramahansa Yogananda  Bhagavad Gita Translation and Commentary (2 Vol set)

Alexander: Higher Stages of Development               Self Recovery: Treating Addictions using TM and MAV

Wallace:     The Physiology of Consciousness      The Neurophysiology of Enlightenment

COOKBOOKS:

  • Vasant Lad: Ayurvedic Cooking for Self Healing
  • Amadea Morningstar: Ayurvedic Cookbook                                                                                                                

Quality Control Literature

Current Good Manufacturing Practices

List of selected literature related to Ayurveda

(Source Unknown)

Ambasta, S.P. The useful plants of India. 1986, Council of Scientific & Industrial Research, New Delhi.

Arora, R.B. et al. (Eds.) Research and development in Oriental medicine. 1990, Orient Medica Congressi, Jammu.

Bajracharya, M.B. The Ayurvedic Records of Cancer Treatment. 1987, PiyushavarsiAusadhalaya, Kathmandu.

Bajracharya, M.B. The real facts of Ayurveda (Based on related ancient science and philosophy). 1995, Piyusavarsi Ausadhalaya, Kathmandu.

Bhishagratna, K.L. Sushruta Samhita, English translation. Sutra-sthana. Vol. 1. 1991, Chowkhamba Sanskrit Series Office, Varanasi.

Bhishagratna, K.L. Sushruta Samhita, English translation. Nidana-sthana, sarira-sthana, chikitsa-sthana and kalpa-sthana. Vol. 2. 1991, Chowkhamba Sanskrit Series Office, Varanasi.

Bhishagratna, K.L. Sushruta Samhita, English translation. Uttara-tantra. Vol. 3. 1991, Chowkhamba Sanskrit Series Office, Varanasi.

Chakraberty, C. An interpretation of ancient Hindu medicine. 1923, Low Price Publications, Delhi.

Chatterjee, A. and Pakrashi, S.C. The treatise on Indian medicinal plants. Vol. 2. 1992, Publications & Informations Directorate, New Delhi.

Chatterjee, P. Ayurvedic Treatment of Cancer. 1955, Institute of Hindu Chemistry & Ayurvedic Research, Calcutta.

Dahanukar, S.A. and Thatte, U.M. Ayurveda revisited. 1993, Popular Prakashan, Bombay.

Dash, B. Concept of agni in Ayurveda with special reference to agnibala pariksa. 1971, Chaukhambha Amarabharati Prakashan, Varanasi.

Dash, B. Fundamentals of Ayurvedic medicine. 1989, Konark Publishers PVT LTD, Delhi.

Dash, B. Ayurvedic cures for common diseases. 1991, Hind Pocket Books, Delhi.

Dash, B. Materia medica of Ayurveda, based on Madanapala’s nighantu. 1991, B. Jain Publishers, New Delhi.

Dash, B. and Kshyap, L. Diagnosis and treatment of diseases in Ayurveda – based on Ayurveda Saukhyam of Todarananda. Vols. 1-5. 1984-1994, Concept Publishing Company, New Delhi.

Dash, B. and Kshyap, L. Five specialised therapies of Ayurveda (Panca Karma) – based on Ayurveda Saukhyam of Todarananda. 1992, Concept Publishing Company, New Delhi.

Dash, B. and Kshyap, L. Iatro-chemistry of Ayurveda (Rasa Sastra) – based on Ayurveda Saukhyam of Todarananda. 1994, Concept Publishing Company, New Delhi.

Dash, V.B. Alchemy and metallic medicines in Ayurveda. 1996, Concept Publishing, New Delhi.

Dash, V.B. and Junius, A.M. A handbook of Ayurveda. 1987, Consept Publishing Company, New Delhi, India.

Devaraj, T.L. Speaking of Ayurvedic Remedies for Common Diseases. 1985, Sterling Publishers, New Delhi.

Dey, A.C. Indian medicinal plants used in Ayurvedic preparations. 1988, Bishen Singh Mahendra Pal Singh, Dehra Dun.

Dhyani, S.C. Dravyaguna siddhanta. A treatise on fundamental principles of dravyaguna vijnana. 1986, Krishnadas Academy, Varanasi.

Dhyani, S.C. Salient Features of Ayurveda. 1987, Chaukhambha Orientalia, Varanasi.

Dhyani, S.C. Rasa panchaka. 1994, Krishnadas Academy, Varanasi.

Dutt, U.C. The materia medica of the Hindus. 1989, Mittal Publications, Delhi.

Dvivedi, V. Ausadhi vijnana sastra (Ayurvedic pharmacology). 1986, Baighanath Ayurved Bhavan Ltd., Calcutta.

Dvivedi, V. Bhavaprakasanighantuh. 1988, Motilal Banarsidas, Varanasi.

Dwarakanatha, C. Introduction to kayachikitsa. 1986, Chaukhambha Orientalia, Varanasi.

Filliozat, J. The Classical Doctrine of Indian Medicine. 1964, Munshiram Manoharlal, Delhi.

Frawley, D. Ayurvedic healing, a comprehensive guide. 1992, Molital Banarsidass Publishers, Delhi.

Gupta, K.R.L. Madhava Nidana – Ayurvedic system of pathology. 1987, Sri Satguru Publications, Delhi.

Gupta, K.R.L. Hindu anatomy, physiology, therapeutics, history of medicine and practice of physic. 1994, Sri Satguru, Delhi.

Gupta, L.P. Essentials of Ayurveda. 1996, Chaukhamba Sanskrit Pratishan, Delhi.

Gupta, L.P. and Guru, L.V. Positive health through Ayurveda. 1989, Jagadamba Prakashana, Varanasi.

Hoernle, A.F.R. Studies in the medicine of ancient India – osteology or the bones of the human body. 1994, Concept Publishing Company, Delhi.

Jolly, J. Indian Medicine. 1977, Munshiram Manoharlal Publishers Pvt. Ltd., New Delhi.

Karnick, C.R. Pharmacology of Ayurvedic medicinal plants. 1996, Sri Satguru Publications, Delhi.

Karnick, C.R. Studies of genetic complex of Ayurvedic plants. 1996, Sri Satguru Publications, Delhi.

Kasture, H.S. Concept of Ayurveda for perfect Health and Longevity. 1991, Shree Baidyanath Ayurveda Bhavan Private Ltd., Nagpur.

Kaviratna, A.C. and Sharma, P. (Eds.) Caraka samhita. Vols. 1-4. 1996, Sri Satguru Publications, Delhi.

Krishnamurthy, K.H. A source book of Indian medicine, an anthology. 1991, B.R. Publishing Corporation, Delhi.

Kroes, B.H. Nimba Arishta. Impact of the Preperation Proces on Chemical Parameters and Immunomodulating Activity. 1990, Dr. Thesis, Rijksuniversiteit Utrecht, Utrecht.

Kumar, A.V. (Ed.) Principles of Ayurvedic therapeutics. 1995, Sri Satguru Publications, Delhi.

Kumar, S. et al. Advances in Research and Education in Ayurveda. 1985, JREIM Publications, Varanasi.

Mahdihassan, S. Indian alchemy or rasayana in the light of ascetism and geriatrics. 1991, Molital Banarsidass Publishers, Delhi.

Majumdar, A.T. Handbook of domestic and common Ayurvedic remedies. 1978, Central Council for Research in Indian Medicine and Homeopathy, New Delhi.

Malhotra, S.C. Pharmacological & Clinical Studies of Guggulu in Hyperlipidaemia / Lipid Metabolism. 1992, Central Council for Research in Ayurveda and Siddha, New Delhi.

Mathur, D.S. Brhannighanturatnakar. Vols. 1-6. 1980-1995, Khemaraj Shrikrishnadas Prakashan, Bombay.

Meulenbeld, G.J. and Wujastyk, D. (Eds.) Studies on Indian medical history. 1987, Egbert Forsten, Groningen.

Mishra, B.L. Dravyaguna hastamalak. 1986, Pablikesion sakim, Jaipur.

Mishra, G.S. Siddhaprayoga latika. Text with English translation. 1992, Chaukhambha Orientalia, Varanasi.

Mishra, G.S. and Sharma, S.K. Rasakamadhenu. Vols. 1-2. 1992, Chaukhambha Orientalia, Varanasi.

Mishra, S.K. Ayurveda – The Science of Life. 1986, Central Council for Research in Ayurveda and Siddha, New Delhi.

Misra, B.S. Bhavaprakash-jvaradhikar. 1949, Caukhamba Sanskrit Series Office, Varanasi.

Misra, B.S. (Ed.) Bhavaprakash. Vols. 1-2. 1993, Chaukhamba Sanskrit Sansthan, Varanasi.

Mitra, J. A Critical Appraisal of Ayurvedic Material in Buddhist Literature. 1985, Jyotiralok Prakashan, Varanasi.

Mookerji, B. Rasa jala nidhi or ocean of Indian chemistry and alchemy. Vols. 1-4. 1984-1994, Avani Prakashan, Ahmedabad.

Mooss, V.N.S. Ayurvedic flora medica. 1978, Vaidhyasarathy Press (P) Ltd., Kottayam.

Morningstar, A. and Desai, U. The Ayurvedic Cookbook. 1996, Motilal Banarsidass, Delhi.

Nadkarni, K.M. and Nadkarni, A.K. Indian materia medica. Vols. 1-2. 1908, Popular Prakashan, Bombay.

Nautiyal, A.R., Nautiyal, M.C. and Purohit, A.N. Harvesting herbs – 2000. Medicinal and aromatic plants – an action plan for Uttarakhand. 1997, Bishen Singh Mahendra Pal Singh, Dehra Dun.

Nair, N.S.N. The efficacy of Ayurvedic drugs on cancer (arbuda). A  non-randomised clinical study. 1987, Amala Ayurvedic Hospital and Research Centre, Trichur Kerala.

Namjoshi, A.N. The Ayurvedic formulary of India. 1978, Govt. of India, Min. of Health, Dept. of Health, New Delhi.

Ojha, J. and Mishra, U. Dhanvantari nighantuh, with Hindi translation and commentary. 1985, Deptt. of Dravyaguna, Inst. of Medical Sciences, Banaras Hindu University, Varanasi.

Pandey, G. Medicinal flowers. 1992, Sri Satguru Publications, Delhi.

Pandey, G. Uncommon plant drugs of Ayurveda. 1994, Sri Satguru Publications, Delhi.

Pandey, V.N. Concept of jatharagni and dhatvagni in Ayurveda, with special reference to malabsorbtion. 1987, Central Council for Research in Ayurveda and Siddha, New Delhi.

Pandey, V.N. Pharmacopoeial standards for Ayurvedic formulations. 1987, Central Council for Research in Ayurveda and Siddha, New Delhi.

Pandey, V.N. et al. Phytochemical investigation of certain medicinal plants used in Ayurveda. 1990, Central Council for Research in Ayurveda and Siddha, New Delhi.

Pandya, N.B. Clinical Application of Ayurvedic Remedies. 1988, Zandu Pharmaceutical Works LTD., Bombay.

Patak, M.L. and Shastri, A.N. Rasayan evam vajikaran vivecan. 1995, Nidhi Prakashan, Patiala.

Pathak, R.R. Therapeutic guide to Ayurvedic medicine. A handbook on Ayurvedic medicine. 1970, Shree Baidyanath Ayurved Bhavan Private Ltd., Patna.

Patiyala, R.P. Madanapalanighantu. 1990, Khemraj Shrikrishnadas Prakasan, Bombay.

Prabhakara Rao, G. Model papers for Ayurvedic competitive examinations. 1994, Chaukhambha Sanskrit Bhawan, Varanasi.

Ramachandra Rao, S.K. Encyclopaedia of Indian medicine. Vols. 1-3. 1985-1987, Popular Prakashan, Bombay.

Ramachandra Rao, S.K. (Ed.) Vrkshayurveda. 1993, Kalpatharu Research Academy, Bangalore.

Ray, P. and Gupta, H.N. Caraka samhita. A scientific synopsis. 1980, Indian National Science Academy, New Delhi.

Roy, M. and Subbarayappa, B.V. Rasarnavakalpa. 1976, Indian National Science Academy, New Delhi.

Royle, J.F. An essay on the antiquity of Hindoo medicine including an introductory lecture to the course of materia medica and therapeutics. Reprint 1837, Bishen Singh Mahendra Pal Singh, Dehra Dun.

Sarin, Y.K. Illustrated manual of herbal drugs used in Ayurveda. 1996, Council of Scientific and Industrial Research & Indian Council of Medical Research, New Delhi.

Sastri, L.C. and Trivedi, R.P. Astanga sangraha. Vols. 1-3. 1988-1997, Baidyanath Ayurved Bhavan, Nagpur.

Sastri, M.K. Brhad dravyagunadarsa. 1978, Ayurvedic evam Tibbi Academy, Lucknow.

Sastri, V.S. and Sarma, C.R.R. Bhela Samhita. 1977, Central Council for Research in Indian Medicine & Homeopathy, New Delhi.

Satpute, A.D. (Ed.) Rasaratna samuchchaya. 1990, Chetan Prakashan, Mysore.

Satyavati, G.V. (Ed.) Medicinal Plants of India. Vols. 1-2. 1976-1987, Indian Council of Medical Research, New Delhi.

Savnur, H.V. A handbook of Ayurvedic materia medica, with principles of pharmacology and therapeutics. Vol. 1. 1950, Jathar & Sons, Belgaum.

Saxena, N. A critical study of yogaratnakar. 1995, Chaukhambha Orientalia, Varanasi.

Sen, G.N. The siddhanta nidanam. Vols. 1-2. 1966, Chowkhamba Sanskrit Series Office, Varanasi.

Sen, G. Hindi pratyaksa sharira. The Hindi translation of the pratyakshashariram. Vol. 1. 1985, Chowkhamba Sanskrit Serie Office, Varanasi.

Sengupta, N. The Ayurvedic System of Medicine. 2 Vols. 1984, Logos Press, New Delhi.

Sengupta, N. and Sengupta, B. Caraka samhita. With ‘Ayurvedadipika’ commentaries of Srimat Cakrapanidatta and ‘Jalpakalpataru’ explanatory notes and annotations of Mahamahopadhyaya. Vol. 1-5. 1991, Chaukhambha Orientalia, Varanasi.

Shah, N.D.C.L. and Bhishagratna, G. Bharata bhaisajya ratnakara. The encyclopaedia of Ayurvedic formulations. Vol. 1-5. 1985, B. Jain Publishers, New Delhi.

Sharma, D.P. Treatise on thirty important baidyanath Ayurvedic products. 1977, Shree Baidyanath Ayurved Bhawan Ltd., Patna.

Sharma, D.P. Vanaushadhi sataka. 1985, Baidhyanath Ayurved Bhavan Pvt. Ltd., Nagpur.

Sharma, J.P. Nighantu-vijnana. 1940, Ci. Cu. Pa. Visvesvaradayaluji Vaidyaraj, Baralokapur.

Sharma, P.S. Realms of Ayurveda. Scientific excursions by nineteen scholars. 1979, Gulab Vazirani (Arnold-Heinemann Publishers), New Delhi, India.

Sharma, P.V. Introduction to dravyaguna. Indian pharmacology. 1976, Chaukhambha Orientalia, Varanasi, India. 

Sharma, P.V. Abhidhaanaratnamaalaa. Sadrasanighantuh. 1977, Chaukhambha Orientalia, Varanasi.

Sharma, P.V. Sodhala nighantu of vaidyacarya sodhala. (Namasangraha and gunasangraha). 1978, Oriental Institute, Baroda.

Sharma, P.V. Fruits and Vegetables in Ancient India. 1979, Chaukhambha Visvabharati, Varanasi.

Sharma, P.V. Caraka samhita. Including critical notes. Vols. 1-4. 1981-1995, Chaukhambha Orientalia, Varanasi.

Sharma, P.V. Dravyaguna vijnana. Vols. 1-5. 1981-1992, Chaukhambha Bharati Academy, Varanasi.

Sharma, P.V. Dalhana and his comments on drugs. 1982, Munshiram Manoharlal, New Delhi.

Sharma, P.V. Cikitsakalika of tisatacarya. Containing Sanskrit commentary of his son Candrata. 1987, Chaukhamba Surbharati Prakashan, Varanasi.

Sharma, P.V. History of medicine in India. 1992, Indian National Science Academy, New Delhi.

Sharma, P.V. (Ed.) Sodasangahrdayam. 1993, Motilal Banarsidass, Delhi.

Sharma, P.V. Ayurveda darshanam – Philosophy of Ayurveda. 1994, Chaukhamba Visvabharati, Varanasi.

Sharma, P.V. (Ed.) Cakradatta. 1994, Chaukhamba Orientalia, Varanasi.

Sharma, P.V. Dravyagunasutram. 1994, Chaukhambha Sanskrit Bhawan, Varanasi.

Sharma, P.V. Priyanighantuh. 1995, Chaukhamba Surbharati Prakashan, Varanasi.

Sharma, P.V. Classical uses of medicinal plants. 1996, Chaukhamba Visvabharati, Varanasi.

Sharma, P.V. Shodasaangahridayam. UNKNOWN YEAR, Padma Prakasan, Varanasi.

Sharma, P.V. and Sharma, G.P. Kaiyadeva-nighantuh. Pathya-apathya vibodhakah. 1979, Varanasi.

Sharma, P.V. and Tripathi, R.S. A Descriptive Catalogue of Manuscripts on Ayurveda in the Banaras Hindu University. 1984, Library, Banaras Hindu University, Varanasi.

Sharma, R.K. Carakasamhita, a sample survey. 1995, Rashtriya Sanskrit Sansthan, New Delhi.

Sharma, R.K. and Dash, B. Caraka Samhita (Text with English translation and critical exposition based on Cakrapani Datta’s Ayurveda Dipika). Vols. 1-3. 1988-1995, Chowkhamba Sanskrit Series Office, Varanasi.

Sharma, S. The system of Ayurveda. Reprint 1929, Low Price Publications, Delhi.

Sharma, S.K. Rasa bhaishajyakalpana vigyana. Vols. 1-2. 1992, Publication Scheme, Jodhpur.

Sharma, S.K. and Joshi, B.C. (Eds.) Heart diseases and Ayurvedic management. 1997, National Academy of Ayurveda, New Delhi.

Sharma, S.K. et al. (Eds.) Kshara sutra therapy in fistula-in-ano and other ano-rectal disorders. 1995, National Academy of Ayurveda, New Delhi.

Sharma, S.N. Concepts of jatharagni in Ayurveda. A patho-physiological study. 1992, Publication Scheme, Jaipur.

Sharma, T. Dravyaushadhi cart. UNKNOWN YEAR, Nath Pustak Bhandar, Rohtak.

Sharma, V.R. Arogya prakash. Vols. 1-2. 1995, Shree Baidyanath Ayurved Bhawan, Calcutta.

Singh, P.R. Vanaushadhi nidarsika. Ayurvediya pharmakopiya. 1983, Uttar Pradesh Hindi Sansthana, Lucknow.

Singh, R.H. Panca karma therapy. Ancient classical concepts, traditional practices and recent advances. 1992, Chowkhamba Sanskrit Series Office, Varanasi.

Singh, T.B. Vanaushadhi-darshika. A guide to sub-Himalayan herbs. 1977, Chaukhamba Amarabharati Prakashan, Varanasi.

Singh, T.B. and Chunekar, K.C. Glossary of Vegetable Drugs in Brhattrayi. 1972, Chowkhamba Sanskrit Series Office, Varanasi.

Singh, V.K. and Khan, A.M. Medicinal plants and folklores. A strategy towards conquest of human ailments. 1989, Today & Tomorrow’s Printers and Publishers, New Delhi.

Singhal, G.D. and Chunekar, K.C. Pharmaceutical considerations in ancient Indian surgery. Based on chapters 28-46 of Sutra-Sthana of Susruta Samhita. 1982, Singhal Publications, Varanasi.

Singhal, G.D. and Dwivedi, R.N. Toxicological Considerations in Ancient Indian Surgery. 1976, G.D. Singhal, Varanasi.

Singhal, G.D. and Guru, L.V. Anatomical and obstetric considerations in ancient Indian surgery. Based on sarira-sthana of susruta samhita. 1973, Singhal Publications, Varanasi.

Singhal, G.D. and Mitra, J. Paediatric & Gynaecological Considerations and Aphorisms in Ancient Indian Surgery. 1980, G.D. Singhal, Varanasi.

Singhal, G.D. and Patterson, T.J.S. Synopsis of Ayurveda – based on a translation of the Susruta Samhita (The treatise of Susruta). 1993, Oxford University Press, Bombay – Calcutta – Madras.

Singhal, G.D. and Sharma, K.R. Ophthalmic & Otorhinolaryngological Considerations in Ancient Indian Surgery. 1976, G.D. Sinhal, Varanasi.

Singhal, G.D. and Shukla, K.P. Medical and psychiatric considerations in ancient Indian surgery. Based on kayacikitsa tantra and bhutavidya tantra of susruta samhita. 1993, Singhal Publications, Varanasi.

Singhal, G.D. and Singh, L.M. Operative Considerations in Ancient Indian Surgery. 1982, G.D. Singhal, Varanasi.

Singhal, G.D. et al. Diagnostic considerations in ancient Indian surgery. Based on Nidana Sthana of Susruta Samhita. 1972, Singhal Publications, Allahabad.

Singhal, G.D. et al. Non-operative considerations in ancient Indian surgery. Based on chapters 24-40 of cikitsa-sthana of susruta samhita. 1979, Singhal Publications, Varanasi.

Singhal, G.D. et al. Fundamental and Plastic Surgery Considerations in Ancient Indian Surgery. 1981, G.D, Singhal, Varanasi.

Singhal, G.D. et al. (Eds.) Ayurvedic Clinical Diagnosis based on Madhava Nidana.Vol. 1. 1985, Singhal Publications, Varanasi.

Sivarajan, V.V. and Balachandran, I. Ayurvedic drugs and their plant sources. 1994, Oxford & IBH Publishing Co, New Delhi – Bombay – Calcutta.

Srikanta Murthy, K.R. Clinical Methods in Ayurveda. 1983, Chaukhambha Orentalia, Varanasi.

Srikanta Murthy, K.R. Sarngadhar-Samhita. A treatise on Ayurveda by Sarngadhara. 1984, Chaukhambha Orientalia, Varanasi.

Srikanta Murthy, K.R. Doctrines of Pathology in Ayurveda. 1987, Chaukhambha Orientalia, Varanasi.

Srikanta Murthy, K.R. Luminaries of Indian medicine. 1987, Chaukhamba Orientalia, Varanasi.

Srikanta Murthy, K.R. Astanga Hrdayam. Vols. 1-3. 1991-1995, Krishnadas Academy, Varanasi.

Srikanta Murthy, K.R. Astanga samgraha of Vagbhata. Vols. 1-3. 1995-1997, Chaukhamba Orientalia, Varanasi.

Srikanta Murthy, K.R. Madhava nidanam. 1995, Chaukhambha Orientalia, Varanasi.

Srikrishnadasa, K.R. Saligramnighantubhusanam. 1981, Khemaraaj Srikrishnasasreshtina, Bombay.

Sukundaram, N.P. Rasamanjari. 1995, Caukhamba Sanskrit Pratistan, Delhi.

Tewari, P.V. (Ed.) Kasyap samhita or Vrddhajivakiya tantra. 1996, Chaukhambha Visvabharati, Varanasi.

Thatte, D.G. and Tiwari, G.P. Current Trends in the Study of Sarira. 1980, Chaukhambha Orientalia, Varanasi.

Trikama, Y.A. Dravyagunavijnanam, 2 Vols. 1983, Baighanath Ayurved Bhavan Ltd, Calcutta.

Tripathi, I.D. Mahausadhi nighantuh. 1971, Caukhamba Vidyabhavan, Varanasi.

Tripathi, I. Rajanighantu of pandit Narahari edited with ‘dravyagunaprakasika’ Hindi commentary. 1982, Krishnadas Academy, Varanasi.

Tripathi, J.D.P. Cakradatta. Savimarsa ‘bhavarthasandipini’ hindibyakhyopeta tippani-parisistaisca vibhusitah. 1983, Chaukhamba Sanskrit Series Office, Varanasi.

Tripathi, S.N. et al. Studies on Guggulu. Clinical & experimental trial of Guggulu in medo-roga (lipid disorders). 1989, Central Council for Research in Ayurveda and Siddha, New Delhi.

Tripathi, S.N. and Tripathi, Y.B. (Eds.) Medical systems with a holistic approach. 1993, Prof. S.N. Tripathi Memorial Foundantion, Varanasi.

Tripati, D.I. Rasayan Khanda of Rasaratnakara. 1982, Chaukhambha Amarabharati Prakashan, Varanasi.

Trivedi, R.P. Charmaroga nidarshika. A textbook on skin diseases both ancient & modern based on two all India seminars. 1991, Baidyanath Ayurved Bhawan Ltd, Nagpur.

Udupa, K.N. et al. Advances in Research in Indian Medicine. 1970, Banaras Hindu University, Varanasi.

Udupa, K.N. and Singh, R.H. Science and Philosophy of Indian Medicine. 1978, Baidyanath Ayurved Bhavan Ltd., Nagpur.

Uniyal, M.R. Prayogaatmak abhinav dravyagunavigjaanam. 1991, New Delhi.

Uniyal, M.R. Ayurved anusandhan-darshaka. 1995, Vaidyanath Ayurved Shodh Samsthan, Patna.

Uniyal, M.R. and Joshi, R.D. Astanga-Samgraha ki vanaushadhiya evam vargikarna. 1981, Kndriya Ayurved evam Siddha anusandhan parishad, New Delhi.

Upadhyay, S.D. Nadi vijnana. Ancient pulse science. 1986, Chaukhambha Sanskrit Pratishthan, Delhi.

Vaidya, B.G. Nighantu adarsa. Vols. 1-2. 1968-1985, Chaukhambha Bharati Academy, Varanasi.

Vaidya, B. Some Controversial Drugs in Indian Medicine. 1982, Chaukhambha Orientala, Varanasi.

Vaisya, R.L. (Ed.) Abhinava butidarpana. Vols. 1-2. 1990, Chowkhamba Sanskrit Series Office, Varanasi.

Verma, G.S. Miracles of Indian Herbs. 1982, Rasayan, New Delhi.

Verma, G.S. Miracles of honey. An approach to natural living. 1984, Rasayan Pharmacy, New Delhi.

Verma, G.S. Miracles of Neem Tree. 1988, Rasayan Pharmacy, New Delhi.

Verma, G.S. Miracles of Fruits. 1990, Rasayan Pharmacy, New Delhi.

Warrier, P.K. et al. Indian medicinal plants – a compendium of 500 species. Vols. 1-5. 1993-1996, Orient Longman, Hyderabad.

Wolz-Gottwald, E. Heilung aus der Ganzheit. Ayurveda als Philosophie in der Praxis. 1991, Hinder + Deelmann, Gladenbach.

Zimmermann, F. The jungle and the aroma of meats, an ecological theme in Hindu medicine. 1987, Bishen Singh mahendra Pal Singh, Dehra Dun

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Interpretation of the Charaka Samhita

Interpretation of the Charaka Samhita by Ayurvedacharya Govind

Fair Use Source: B01HQTW366 (IChSm)

This is a new translation, with annotations, of the Charaka Samhita–the oldest literature in the world on health and on the prevention, diagnosis and treatment of disease. It was first translated into Arabic and Hebrew. The original literature is written in Sanskrit in the Devanagari script. This literature, which is thousands of years old, up to now has been very hard for the general European reader to understand.

Ayuvedacharya Dr. Rajpoot has lived in Europe for 27 years and has learned about the European way of thinking during this time. He explains the Charaka Samhita very clearly, using examples from present-day European culture, so that today’s reader can comprehend it.

The Charaka Samhita will be published in translation with commentary by Dr. Rajpoot in 12 volumes. This is part A of Volume 1, which has 16 chapters, as follows:

Chapter 1: human beings, consciousness, dharma, manifestation and stagnation of the gunas, silence, body and mind, Tridosh, Ras and its enormous force, Tastes affect the doshas, medicines, Virechan, vomiting, laxatives, fruits, fats, salts, urine, milk etc.
Chapter 2: Ingredients for nasya oil, inhalation, inducing vomiting, fat free enema, snehan, svedan, appetite and alleviating colic, digesting, diarrhea, bloody diarrhea, urination, parasites, thirst, weight gain or loss, lubricate, flatulence, sore throat, lethargy, to suppress appetite, panchkarma medicines.
Chapter 3: Mixtures for preparing ointment, alleviating itching, impetigo, ameliorating skin disease, Ubtan and abhyang oils, bdominal pain, gout or vatarakt, headache, back pain, burning sensation, removing toxins, excess sweating, eliminating body odor,
Chapter 4: classification of herbs
Chapter 5: Food, amounts of food, digestion, digestive force, andjana, inhalation, smoking technique, nasal procedure, cleaning the oral cavity, Gandusha – swishing oil in the mouth, dripping oil into the ears, Abhyang, oil massage, Foot massage etc.
Chapter 6: diet, Ahar and vihar, The six seasons, Visarg and adan kal,
Chapter 7: Disorders that come from suppressing natural needs, urinate, excrete stool, sperms, gas, vomiting, sneezing, burping, yawning, hunger, thirst, tears, sleep, breathing, speak. Act according to dharma, artha and karma. Physical exercise etc.
Chapter 8: The sense organs, Chitta, mind, three gunas, happiness and unhappiness, Sense organs and the mahabhuts, Correct behavior,
Chapter 9: The four qualities of the Ayurvedic practitioner, dravya, assistant and invalid
Chapter 10: Successfulness of the Ayurvedic practitioner, Kind of maladies, characteristics of curable and incurable diseases etc.
Chapter 11: Desires, Atma, Realization, Definition of an Ayurvedic practitioner, Pratyaksha, Anumana, Sanyog, Yukti, Reincarnation, Senses and disease, Pragyaparadha, Kinds of maladies
Chapter 12: Vata dosha
Chapter 13: Lubricants and lubrication, animal, plant sneh (oils),Ghee , Madjdja, Bone marrow
Chapter 14: Hot provedures: warm pouch, sauna, steam svedan with the aid of a hose, broth bath, Agni sanskar, heating on a bed, heating through sprinkling, heating using a pit, circular room, heating with the aid of the earth, another kind of heating etc.
Chapter 15: Rules of procedures, Equipment, vaman and virechan procxedures.
Chapter 16: Ayurvedic practitioner, Indications for vaman and virechan

Book Details

  • ASIN: B01HQTW366
  • Publisher: Ayurvedacharya Dr. Govind Rajpoot PhD; 1st edition (June 28, 2016)
  • Publication date: June 28, 2016
  • Print length: 513 pages

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Ayurvedic Cooking for Self Healing by Vasant Lad and Usha Lad

See Ayurvedic Cooking for Self Healing by Vasant Lad and Usha Lad

Fair Use Source: B08VQN6RWT (ACSH)

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Buddha-Dharma-Sangha Buddhist Ayurvedic Medicine History

Emotions and Taste-Flavor of Herbs, Spices and Foods according to Ayurveda

What is AyurvedaBuddhist Ayurvedic Medicine, Seven Dhatus – Bodily Tissues, Buddhist Ayurvedic Nutrition and Food Therapy

Tastes and Emotions

“Emotions also have a certain taste or flavor and affect the body according to their qualities. There are bitter emotions like grief, or astringent emotions like fear–these aggravate Vata. There are sour emotions like envy, or pungent emotions like anger–these aggravate Pitta. And there are sweet emotions like desire, or salty emotions like greed–these aggravate Kapha.

Emotions can have the same effect upon the body as wrong foods, drugs, alcohol, or infections. Psychological factors have the power to overcome physiological factors in treatment. For this reason Ayurveda also has a science of the energetics of the psyche. The unified body-mind science of Ayurveda allows us to use herbs to help counteract mental states and emotional problems.

The science of rasa, or taste, and its energetics, comprehends not only herbs and food but also the mind. Like other aspects of the Ayurvedic language of healing, taste has value on all levels of manifestation, both inner and outer.”

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Tastes-Flavors of Foods according to Ayurveda

What is AyurvedaBuddhist Ayurvedic Medicine, Seven Dhatus – Bodily Tissues, Buddhist Ayurvedic Nutrition and Food Therapy

Tastes and Foods

“Like herbs, foods have therapeutic properties according to the tastes and elements which dominate them. In Ayurveda a special that is prescribed along with the use of particular herbs. Generally, the patient is told to follow the that that tends to alleviate his or her particular Dosha. However, particular foods are prescribed therapeutically as herbs, or in combination with herbs. Such substances include milk, honey, ghee, raisins, dates and almonds. Herbology and nutrition are a single science in Ayurveda, and no treatment can be truly efficacious that neglects one or the other. Food deals with the “grosser nutrition” of the body; herbs give subtle nutrition and stimulation to the deeper tissues and organs.”

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Combined Tastes-Flavors of Herbs, Spices and Foods according to Ayurveda

What is AyurvedaBuddhist Ayurvedic Medicine, Seven Dhatus – Bodily Tissues, Buddhist Ayurvedic Nutrition and Food Therapy

Combined “Tastes”

Tastes of herbs are seldom single, though one usually predominates.

Sweet and pungent tastes sometimes combine, as with cinnamon, fennel, ginger and onion. Such herbs are particularly good for Vata.

Sweet and astringent often combine, as with comfrey, lotus, slippery elm and white pond Lily Such herbs are particularly good for Pitta but may be hard to digest.

Sweet and bitter sometimes combine, as widi licorice. These herbs are also particularly good for Pitta.

Sweet and sour combine in various fruit like hawthorn and oranges. They are very good for Vata.

Pungent and bitter sometimes combine as with motherwort, mug-wort, wormwood and yarrow. Such herbs have a strong effect on Kapha.

Pungent and astringent combine occasionally, as with bayberry, cinnamon or sage. They also work on Kapha.

Bitter and astringent often combine, as in many diuretics. Such herbs include golden seal, plantain and uva ursi. They work mainly on Pitta.

Some herbs possess three or more tastes. For herbs of multiple tastes the energy and post-digestive effect become important for determining their effect. Herbs of multiple tastes often possess powerful or broad spectrum healing action like garlic.”

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Kashaya – Astringent Taste-Flavor of Herbs, Spices and Foods according to Ayurveda

What is AyurvedaBuddhist Ayurvedic Medicine, Seven Dhatus – Bodily Tissues, Buddhist Ayurvedic Nutrition and Food Therapy

VI. Astringent

“Astringent taste is a sedative, stops diarrhea, aids in healing of joints, promotes the closing and healing of sores and wounds. It is drying, firming, contracting. It alleviates Kapha, Pitta and stops bleeding. Astringent taste promotes absorption of bodily fluids; it is dry, cooling and light.

“Yet when used too much by itself or in excess, it causes drying of the mouth, produces pain in the heart, causes constipation, weakens the voice, obstructs channels of circulation, makes the skin dark, weakens vitality, causes premature aging. Astringent taste causes the retention of gas, urine and feces, creates emaciation, weariness, thirst and stiffness. Owing to its natural properties of roughness, dryness and clearness, it causes Vata-diseases like paralysis, spasms and convulsions.”

Astringent taste is hemostatic (stops bleeding), stops sweating, stops diarrhea, as it promotes absorption of fluids and inhibits their elimination. It is anti-inflammatory, vulnerary (closes wounds and promotes healing by knitting the membranes back together). It constricts the muscles and helps raise prolapsed organs.

Astringent Herbs: Astringent taste is also very common in herbs, but it is not of such therapeutic importance, as astringent action is used mainly symptomatically Astringency derives mainly from the presence of various tannins.

Typical astringent herbs include cranesbill, lotus seeds, mullein, plantain, pomegranate, raspberry leaves, sumach, uva ursi, white pond lily, white oak bark and witch hazel.”

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Titka – Bitter Taste-Flavor of Herbs, Spices and Foods according to Ayurveda

What is AyurvedaBuddhist Ayurvedic Medicine, Seven Dhatus – Bodily Tissues, Buddhist Ayurvedic Nutrition and Food Therapy

IV. Pungent

“The pungent taste is cleansing to the mouth, enkindles digestive fire, purifies food, promotes nasal secretions, causes tears and gives clarity to the senses. It helps cure diseases of intestinal torpor, obesity, abdominal swelling and excessive liquid in the body. It helps discharge oily, sweaty and sticky waste products. It gives taste to food, stops itching, helps the resolution of skin growths, kills worms, is germicidal, corrodes the muscle tissues, moves blood clots and blood stagnation, breaks up obstructions, opens the vessels, alleviates Kapha. It is light, hot and dry.

“Yet when used too much by itself or in excess causes a weakening of virility by its post-digestive effect. By its taste and hot potency, it causes delusion, weariness, languor, emaciation. Pungent taste causes fainting, prostration, loss of consciousness and dizziness. It burns the throat, generates a burning sensation in the body, diminishes strength and causes diirst. By its predominance of fire and air, pungent taste creates various burning sensations, tremors, and piercing and stabbing pains throughout the body/’

Pungent taste is stimulating, promotes digestion, increases appetite, is diaphoretic (causes sweating) and expectorant (removes phlegm) and is vermicidal (kills parasites). It promotes circulation and generally increases all bodily functions, while reducing all foreign accretions in the body.

Pungent Herbs: Pungent taste arises mainly from various aromatic oils. It is more common than sweet but not abundant. Still, many herbs belong to this category and they are very useful and often become spices and condiments. Pungent taste includes acrid, spicy and aromatic.

Typical pungent herbs include angelica, asafoetida, basil, bayberry, bay leaves, black pepper, camphor, cardamom, cayenne, cinnamon, cloves, coriander, cumin, ephedra, eucalyptus, garlic, ginger, horseradish, mustard, onions, oregano, peppermint, prickly ash, rosemary, sage, sassafras, spearmint, thyme, and valerian.

V. Bitter

“Bitter taste, though it does not taste good in itself, restores the sense of taste. It is detoxifying, antibacterial, germicidal, and kills worms. It relieves fainting, burning sensation, itch, inflammatory skin conditions and thirst. Bitter taste creates tightness of the skin and muscles. It is antipyretic, febrifuge; it enkindles digestive fire, promotes digestion of toxins, purifies lactation, helps scrape away fat and remove toxic accumulations in fat, marrow, lymph, sweat, urine, excrement, Pitta and Kapha. It is dry, cold and light.

“Yet when used by itself or in excess, owing to its natural properties of dryness, roughness and clearness, it causes a wasting away of all the tissue elements of the body. Bitter taste produces roughness in the vessels, takes away strength, causes emaciation, weariness, delusion, dizziness, dryness of the mouth and other diseases of Vata!’

Bitter taste reduces fevers, is anti-inflammatory, antibacterial, detoxifying and germicidal. It is cleansing to the blood and all tissues in general and helps reduce tumors. It has a reducing, depleting and sedating effect upon the body, although in small amounts it is stimulating, particularly to digestion.

Bitter Herbs: Bitter is a very common taste in herbs and plants. It arises from various bitter principles like berberine. Bitters may be simple, like gentian. They may be aromatic (pungent secondarily), like wormwood. Or they may be astringent (secondarily) like golden seal.

Typical bitter herbs include aloe, barberry, blessed thistle, blue flag, chapparaL chrysanthemum, dandelion, echinacea, gentian, golden seal, pao d’arco, Peruvian bark, rhubarb, rue, tansy, white poplar, yarrow and yellow dock.”

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Katu – Pungent-Spicy Taste-Flavor of Herbs, Spices and Foods according to Ayurveda

What is AyurvedaBuddhist Ayurvedic Medicine, Seven Dhatus – Bodily Tissues, Buddhist Ayurvedic Nutrition and Food Therapy

IV. Pungent

“The pungent taste is cleansing to the mouth, enkindles digestive fire, purifies food, promotes nasal secretions, causes tears and gives clarity to the senses. It helps cure diseases of intestinal torpor, obesity, abdominal swelling and excessive liquid in the body. It helps discharge oily, sweaty and sticky waste products. It gives taste to food, stops itching, helps the resolution of skin growths, kills worms, is germicidal, corrodes the muscle tissues, moves blood clots and blood stagnation, breaks up obstructions, opens the vessels, alleviates Kapha. It is light, hot and dry.

“Yet when used too much by itself or in excess causes a weakening of virility by its post-digestive effect. By its taste and hot potency, it causes delusion, weariness, languor, emaciation. Pungent taste causes fainting, prostration, loss of consciousness and dizziness. It burns the throat, generates a burning sensation in the body, diminishes strength and causes diirst. By its predominance of fire and air, pungent taste creates various burning sensations, tremors, and piercing and stabbing pains throughout the body/’

Pungent taste is stimulating, promotes digestion, increases appetite, is diaphoretic (causes sweating) and expectorant (removes phlegm) and is vermicidal (kills parasites). It promotes circulation and generally increases all bodily functions, while reducing all foreign accretions in the body.

Pungent Herbs: Pungent taste arises mainly from various aromatic oils. It is more common than sweet but not abundant. Still, many herbs belong to this category and they are very useful and often become spices and condiments. Pungent taste includes acrid, spicy and aromatic.

Typical pungent herbs include angelica, asafoetida, basil, bayberry, bay leaves, black pepper, camphor, cardamom, cayenne, cinnamon, cloves, coriander, cumin, ephedra, eucalyptus, garlic, ginger, horseradish, mustard, onions, oregano, peppermint, prickly ash, rosemary, sage, sassafras, spearmint, thyme, and valerian.”

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Buddhist Ayurvedic Nutrition and Food Therapy

What is AyurvedaBuddhist Ayurvedic Medicine, Seven Dhatus – Bodily Tissues,  Srotamsi – Bodily Channels and Bodily Systems

Buddhist Ayurvedic Nutrition and Food Therapy

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