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Cloud DevOps History Software Engineering

Agile Manifesto – The Manifesto for Agile Software Development

See also: Agile software development and DevOps

The Manifesto for Agile Software Development

Agile software development values

“Based on their combined experience of developing software and helping others do that, the seventeen signatories to the manifesto proclaimed that they value:[5]” (WP)

  • Individuals and interactions over processes and tools
  • Working software over comprehensive documentation
  • Customer collaboration over contract negotiation
  • Responding to change over following a plan

That is to say, the items on the left are valued more than the items on the right.

As Scott Ambler elucidated:[21]

  • Tools and processes are important, but it is more important to have competent people working together effectively.
  • Good documentation is useful in helping people to understand how the software is built and how to use it, but the main point of development is to create software, not documentation.
  • A contract is important but is no substitute for working closely with customers to discover what they need.
  • A project plan is important, but it must not be too rigid to accommodate changes in technology or the environment, stakeholders’ priorities, and people’s understanding of the problem and its solution.

Some of the authors formed the Agile Alliance, a non-profit organization that promotes software development according to the manifesto’s values and principles. Introducing the manifesto on behalf of the Agile Alliance, Jim Highsmith said,

The Agile movement is not anti-methodology, in fact many of us want to restore credibility to the word methodology. We want to restore a balance. We embrace modeling, but not in order to file some diagram in a dusty corporate repository. We embrace documentation, but not hundreds of pages of never-maintained and rarely-used tomes. We plan, but recognize the limits of planning in a turbulent environment. Those who would brand proponents of XP or SCRUM or any of the other Agile Methodologies as “hackers” are ignorant of both the methodologies and the original definition of the term hacker.— Jim Highsmith, History: The Agile Manifesto[22]

Agile software development principles

The Manifesto for Agile Software Development is based on twelve principles:[23]” (WP)

  1. Customer satisfaction by early and continuous delivery of valuable software.
  2. Welcome changing requirements, even in late development.
  3. Deliver working software frequently (weeks rather than months)
  4. Close, daily cooperation between business people and developers
  5. Projects are built around motivated individuals, who should be trusted
  6. Face-to-face conversation is the best form of communication (co-location)
  7. Working software is the primary measure of progress
  8. Sustainable development, able to maintain a constant pace
  9. Continuous attention to technical excellence and good design
  10. Simplicity—the art of maximizing the amount of work not done—is essential
  11. Best architectures, requirements, and designs emerge from self-organizing teams
  12. Regularly, the team reflects on how to become more effective, and adjusts accordingly

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Gather Info, Take Action, Gather Info, Sleep, Repeat

“When action grows unprofitable, gather information; when information grows unprofitable, sleep. —Ursula K. Le Guin, The Left Hand of Darkness

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Artificial Intelligence Cloud Data Science - Big Data Hardware and Electronics History Software Engineering

Computing Philosophy: Logic, Order, Rules, and Clarity

“We think we are creating the system for our own purposes. We believe we are making it in our own image . . . But the computer is not really like us. It is a projection of a very slim part of ourselves: that portion devoted to logic, order, rule, and clarity.”

— Ellen Ullman, Close to the Machine: Technophilia and its Discontents

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History

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Bibliography Buddha-Dharma-Sangha History

Seeing the Sacred in Samsara: Illustrated Guide to the Eighty-Four Mahasiddhas

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Rare paintings set aside life stories of each of the eighty-four wild Buddhist saints of ancient India.

This exquisite full-color presentation of the lives of the eighty-four mahāsiddhas, or “great accomplished ones,” offers a fresh glimpse into the world of the famous tantric yogis of medieval India. The stories of these tantric saints have captured the imagination of Buddhists across Asia for nearly a millennium. Unlike monks and nuns who renounce the world, these saints sought the sacred in the midst of samsara. Some were simple peasants who meditated while doing manual labor. Others were kings and queens who traded the comfort and riches of the palace for the danger and transgression of the charnel ground. Still others were sinners—pimps, drunkards, gamblers, and hunters—who transformed their sins into sanctity.

This book includes striking depictions of each of the mahāsiddhas by a master Tibetan painter, whose work has been preserved in pristine condition. Published here for the first time in its entirety, this collection includes details of the painting elements along with the life stories of the tantric saints, making this one of the most comprehensive works available on the eighty-four mahāsiddhas.

Reviews

“Seeing the Sacred in Samsara is a gem that should adorn the library of every Tibetan Buddhist or that of anyone who has more than a passing interest in Tibetan Buddhism. This book brings to life the stories of the Indian mahāsiddhas, hugely important figures in the imagination of the
Tibetan Vajrayana tradition.”—Thupten Jinpa, Principal English Translator to His Holiness the Dalai Lama

“Commissioned from an artist in eastern Tibet by a senior member of the Thirteenth Dalai Lama’s government but never displayed or published before, these remarkable paintings offer fresh insight into the workings of a master painter and the conversion of religious concepts into images. Written with his characteristic clarity and elegance, Professor Lopez has produced a book that will be a delight for admirers of Tibetan painting and a wonderful resource for students of Tibetan Buddhism.”—Clare Harris, Professor of Visual Anthropology, University of Oxford

“This book makes available for the first time a beautiful set of paintings of the Indian siddhas from early twentieth century Tibet. Lopez’s introduction provides the reader with a marvelous overview of the siddhas, their social context, the tantric tradition to which they belonged, their doctrines, and their depiction in Tibetan art history. A feast for both the eye and the mind, Seeing the Sacred in Samsara is a superb primer on one of the most important and fascinating saintly confederations in all of Buddhist history.”—José Cabezón, Dalai Lama Professor of Tibetan Buddhism and Cultural Studies, University of California Santa Barbara

Seeing the Sacred in Samsara is a wonder, a one-of-a-kind collection… It will serve as a timeless inspiration for all wisdom seekers for generations to come.”—New York Journal of Books

About the Author

Donald S. Lopez Jr. is the Arthur E. Link Distinguished University Professor of Buddhist and Tibetan Studies at the University of Michigan. He specializes in late Indian Mahāyāna Buddhism and Tibetan Buddhism. His recent books include Gendun Chopel: Tibet’s Modern Visionary and Hyecho’s Journey: The World of Buddhism.

Book Details

  • ASIN: B07JD1Q2Y7
  • Publisher: Shambhala (May 28, 2019)
  • Publication date: May 28, 2019
  • Print length: 229 pages

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Mahasiddhas

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Mahasiddhas: La vie de 84 sages de l’Inde (French)

Mahasiddhas: La vie de 84 sages de l’Inde (French Edition) Abhayadatta (Author), Comité Padmakara (Translator)

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“Au début de notre ère, lorsque se répandirent les enseignements du Bouddha auxquels fut donné le nom de Grand Véhicule, apparurent nombre de maîtres remarquables qui devinrent célèbres sous le nom sanskrit de mahâsiddhas, “grands êtres accomplis”, parce qu’ils avaient atteint les siddhis, ou “accomplissements”.
La tradition a surtout retenu le nom de quatre vingt- quatre d’entre eux.
Voici l’histoire de leurs vies, appelées “libérations parfaites”, où se côtoient anecdotes insolites et enseignements profonds que couronne toujours l’Éveil libre de toute entrave : le Grand Sceau qui inspire à Ghandika ce chant de réalisation :

Comme le remède et le poison
Participent de la même essence
En produisant deux effets distincts,
Les actes négatifs et leurs antidotes
Ont la même nature et ne diffèrent point.
Ce que réalisant, les sages ne rejettent rien,
Mais les êtres puérils, dans leur ignorance,
Ne le réalisent pas et errent dans le samsâra,
Mûs par les cinq poisons.

Book Details

  • ASIN: B00ZI97BVY
  • Publication date: July 1, 2003
  • Language: French
  • Print length : 239 pages
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Buddha-Dharma-Sangha Buddhist Ayurvedic Medicine History

Care of and Respect for Buddha Dharma Materials

Care of Dharma Materials

“Dharma materials contain the teachings of the Buddha and thus protect against lower rebirth and reveal the path to enlightenment. Therefore, they should be treated with respect.

Printed Dharma materials, as well as phones, tablets, laptops, and hard drives containing Dharma, should be kept off the floor, beds, chairs, meditation cushions, and all other places where people sit or walk. Dharma materials should not be stepped over or put in places where the feet or bum will point at them. They should be covered or protected for transporting and kept in a high, clean place separate from more mundane materials. Other objects, including statues, stupas, ritual implements, malas, reading glasses, etc., should not be placed on top of Dharma books and devices containing Dharma materials. Avoid licking the fingers to turn the pages of Dharma texts.

If it is necessary to dispose of printed Dharma materials, they should be burned rather than thrown in the trash. When burning Dharma texts, visualize that the letters transform into an A () and the A absorbs into your heart. Imagine burning blank paper. As the paper burns, recite OM ĀH HŪM or the Heart Sutra, while meditating on emptiness.

Lama Zopa Rinpoche recommends that images of holy beings, deities, and holy objects not be burned. Ideally, they should be put in a stupa. Otherwise, put them high up in a tree inside a well-sealed structure, something like a bird house, so that the images are protected from the weather and do not end up on the ground.”

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SpokenSanskrit.org

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Namo – Namas

“I Take Refuge in the Triple Jewel (Namo Buddha, Dharma, and Sangha)”

नमस् n. namas means obeisance. (SSO)

Nama (नम) is general salutation. Namo namah is actually repeating it twice (first one is pronounced as Namo while being repeated)

There is an alternate explanation given by some Hindu acharyas. “Na” in Sanskrit is negation, “Ma” means “mine”. If we join them together then we can derive a meaning “Not mine”. When we pray to Buddhas / Gods, we repeat that whatever we are getting in this world is actually “not mine” (indirectly we are referring that it is because of the Deity’s blessings).

नमस् m. namas salutation
नमस्ते phrase namaste I bow to you. [Yoga]
नमस्ते sent. namaste salute you
नमस्कार m. namaskAra Hello! [formal]
नमस्कारः expr. namaskAraH Good afternoon
नमस्कारः expr. namaskAraH Good evening.
नमस्करोति { नमस्- कृ } verb 8 namaskaroti { namas- kR } salute
नमस्कारः, आगच्छ. sentence namaskAraH, Agaccha. Good morning, please come.
अहं त्वां नमस्कारोमि sent. ahaM tvAM namaskAromi I salute you.
नमस्कारः, कुशलम् किम्? sentence namaskAraH, kuzalam kim? Good morning. How do you do?
नमस् n. namas thunderbolt
नमस् n. namas reverential salutation
नमस् m. namas inarticulate cry
नमस् n. namas gift
नमस् n. namas food
नमस् n. namas donation
नमस् n. namas bow
नमस् n. namas adoration
नमस् n. namas homage
नमस adj. namasa kind
नमस adj. namasa favourable
नमस m. namasa agreement
नमस्य adj. namasya venerable or humble
नमस्य adj. namasya deserving or paying homage
नमस्ते sent. namaste Hello ! [formal]
नमस्यु adj. namasyu worshipping
नमस्या f. namasyA reverence
नमस्यु adj. namasyu doing homage
नमस्यु adj. namasyu bowing down
नमस्या f. namasyA adoration
नामशेष adj. nAmazeSa having only the name left i.e. dead
नामशेष m. nAmazeSa death
नमस्विन् adj. namasvin worshipping
नमसान adj. namasAna worshipping
नमसित adj. namasita worshipped
नमस्विन् adj. namasvin reverential
नमसित adj. namasita reverenced
नमस्वत् adj. namasvat paying or inspiring veneration
नमसान adj. namasAna paying obeisance
नमस्यति { नमस्य } verb namasyati { namasya } be humble or deferential
नमस्यति { नमस्य } verb namasyati { namasya } worship
नमस्यति { नमस्य } verb namasyati { namasya } pay homage
नामशुण्डी f. nAmazuNDI kind of gourd
नमस्कार m. namaskAra sort of poison
नमस्कारी f. namaskArI kind of plant
नमस्कृति f. namaskRti homage
नमस्कार m. namaskAra homage
नमस्कार m. namaskAra exclamation
नमस्कृति f. namaskRti adoration

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Amitayus Buddha – Amitabha Buddha in Sambhogakaya Form

“I Take Refuge in the Triple Jewel (Buddha Amitayus, Dharma, and Sangha)”

Amitayus (Skt. Amitāyus, Tib. ཚེ་དཔག་མེད་TsepakméWyl. tshe dpag med), ‘The Buddha of Boundless Life’ — a sambhogakaya aspect of Amitabha, particularly associated with longevity. He is mostly depicted sitting and holding in his hands a vessel containing the nectar of immortality. Amitayus is also one of the three deities of long life.” (RgWik)

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Akshobhya Buddha – Medicine Buddha in Sambhogakaya Form

“I Take Refuge in the Triple Jewel (Buddha Akshobhya, Dharma, and Sangha)”

Akshobhya (Skt. Akṣobhya; Tib. མི་བསྐྱོད་པ་MikyöpaWyl. mi bskyod pa; Eng. ‘The Unshakeable’) — one of the Buddhas of the five families in saṃbhogakāya form. He is the Buddha of the vajra family, associated with the east, and is usually depicted as blue in color and holding a vajra. His buddha world is called Abhirati (Tib. མངོན་པར་དགའ་བ་ or མངོན་དགའ་ngönpar gawa, Wyl. mngon par dga’ ba).” (RgWik)

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Medicine Buddha Akshobhya as Guhyasamaja

Guhyasamaja (Skt. Guhyasamāja; Tib. གསང་བ་འདུས་པ་sangwa düpaWyl. gsang ba ‘dus pa) is a manifestation of Buddha Akshobhya.” (RgWik)

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Guhyasamaja Tantra of 32 Deities of Medicine Buddha Akshobhya

“The Guhyasamaja Tantra (Skt. Guhyasamāja-tantra; Tib. གསང་བ་འདུས་པ་sangwa düpaWyl. gsang ba ‘dus pa) is the main Guhyasamaja tantra of the Desire Class of Father Tantras. According to the Blue Annals, it was first taught by Buddha Shakyamuni to King Indrabodhi of Oddiyana.” (RgWik)

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Further Reading
  • A Critical Study of the Guhyasamāja Tantra, Fremantle, Francesca, Ph.D. dissertation, University of London (1971).
  • A Lamp to Illuminate the Five Stages
  • Āryadeva’s Lamp that Integrates the Practices (Caryāmelāpakapradīpa): The Gradual Path of Vajrayāna Buddhism according to the Esoteric Community Noble Tradition, edited and translated by Christian K. Wedemeyer (New York: American Institute of Buddhist Studies/Columbia University Press, 2007), ISBN 978-0975373453
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